To navigate this page, any available resources will appear as links below the Content Expectation. Please contact david.johnson@wmisd.org if you have a public domain resource which could be linked to one of these standards.

Vocabulary: The attached vocabulary list came from the Michigan Citizenship Collaborative Curriculum and should be covered throughout the course of the year if you're following the MC3 units.

"I Can" Statements The attached "I Can" statements were developed during the Wexford-Missaukee Intermediate School District curriculum review for Social Studies.
Common Core Writing Examples from Mason Lake Oceana ISD's Social Studies Network.

Common Core (College and Career Readiness Standards) for content literacy in Social Studies (through ELA standards)

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 1 - Why are Families and schools important?
K - E1.0.1: Describe economic wants they have experienced.

1 - H2.0.1: Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among past, present, and future using family or school events.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Games to Teach Past, Present, Future

1 - G4.0.1: Use components of culture (e.g., foods, language, religion, traditions) to describe diversity in family life.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Wizard of Oz Chapter 1
Using a chapter of a book can always make kids want to read a little more. While Wizard of Oz might be above the first grade reading level, they might remember it later. This chapter, if read aloud could be used to ask the following questions (and similar ones:) Has Dorothy's family lived there a long time? What is Dorothy's family like? Is your family like Dorothy's or not? Why? This hits Reading Standard for Literature 1. Recalling the characters, setting, and events listed will hit Reading Standard 3. A discussion on word choice (how they convey mood) would hit Standard 4.Writing about some of these things could hit Writing Standard 3.
With first grade Social Studies MC3 units being focused around Families and Schools, this is applicable.

1 - C1.0.1: Identify some reasons for rules in school (e.g., provide order, predictability, and safety).
resource.jpgRESOURCE: School Rules
The resource above are general first grade class rules developed by a teacher. One strategy would be to begin by asking students why we have rules in school and creating a list on the board. From there, use your own classroom rules and this handout to: Identify the connection between the two lists (What is alike and similar) CCRS Informational Text standard 3, and IT Standard 9. Extend with a writing piece (CCRS Writing 2) where they talk about why we have rules in a classroom.

1 - C5.0.1: Describe some responsibilities people have at home and at school (e.g., taking care of oneself, respect for the rights of others, following rules, getting along with others).
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Workbook of Values
The free workbook would not be used in its full form, however, each story has a subheading "Educational Value" There are several on responsibility and rules. Having students read along and then retell the major events in the story, as well as identifying the message would hit Reading Standard 1. Describing setting, characters, and major events would hit Reading Standard 2.

1 - E1.0.2: Describe ways in which families consume goods and services.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: 1st Grade Economics
This complete plan covers wants and needs, the ways in which families consume goods and services, how goods are produced, etc. Using any of the individual parts of this resource would hit upon multiple GLCE. As for the CCRS, going through the individual lessons you could make a case for asking and answering questions about key details in a text (Informational Text 1). With the discussion on key terms such as "goods and services" "producers and consumers", etc. a written response where students identify the meanings of these terms and give an example would help hit Writing Standard 2.


folder.jpgMC3 Unit 2 - How do we get what we need or want?
K - E1.0.1: Describe economic wants they have experienced.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: 1st Grade Economics
This complete plan covers wants and needs, the ways in which families consume goods and services, how goods are produced, etc. Using any of the individual parts of this resource would hit upon multiple GLCE. As for the CCRS, going through the individual lessons you could make a case for asking and answering questions about key details in a text (Informational Text 1). With the discussion on key terms such as "goods and services" "producers and consumers", etc. a written response where students identify the meanings of these terms and give an example would help hit Writing Standard 2.

K - E1.0.2: Distinguish between goods and services.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: 1st Grade Economics
This complete plan covers wants and needs, the ways in which families consume goods and services, how goods are produced, etc. Using any of the individual parts of this resource would hit upon multiple GLCE. As for the CCRS, going through the individual lessons you could make a case for asking and answering questions about key details in a text (Informational Text 1). With the discussion on key terms such as "goods and services" "producers and consumers", etc. a written response where students identify the meanings of these terms and give an example would help hit Writing Standard 2.

1 - E1.0.1: Distinguish between producers and consumers of goods and services.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: 1st Grade Economics
This complete plan covers wants and needs, the ways in which families consume goods and services, how goods are produced, etc. Using any of the individual parts of this resource would hit upon multiple GLCE. As for the CCRS, going through the individual lessons you could make a case for asking and answering questions about key details in a text (Informational Text 1). With the discussion on key terms such as "goods and services" "producers and consumers", etc. a written response where students identify the meanings of these terms and give an example would help hit Writing Standard 2.

1 - E1.0.2: Describe ways in which families consume goods and services.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: 1st Grade Economics
This complete plan covers wants and needs, the ways in which families consume goods and services, how goods are produced, etc. Using any of the individual parts of this resource would hit upon multiple GLCE. As for the CCRS, going through the individual lessons you could make a case for asking and answering questions about key details in a text (Informational Text 1). With the discussion on key terms such as "goods and services" "producers and consumers", etc. a written response where students identify the meanings of these terms and give an example would help hit Writing Standard 2.

1 - E1.0.3: Using examples, explain why people cannot have everything they want (scarcity) and describe how people respond (choice).

1 - E1.0.4: Describe reasons why people voluntarily trade.

1 - E1.0.5: Describe ways in which people earn money (e.g., providing goods and services to others, jobs).

1 - E1.0.6: Describe how money simplifies trade.

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 3 - How do we learn about places?
1 - G1.0.1: Construct simple maps of the classroom to demonstrate aerial perspective.

No attached resource for this GLCE. Having students construct these maps is a performance task. If you asked questions about why things are located where they are and force students into that discussion you could hit INformational text standard 4, 5, and 1.

1 - G1.0.2: Give examples of places that have absolute locations (e.g., home address, school address).
resource.jpgRESOURCE: US States and Capitals
Using the attached video clip at this resource, instruct students that the capitals shown on the map are the absolute locations. There were times when Wakko was showing the absolute location of a place, and others when a state was described with the relative location. Have students watch a second time to try and pick out the main differences, pausing when necessary. This will hit Reading Standard 1.

1 - G1.0.3: Use personal directions (left, right, front, back) to describe the relative location of significant places in the school environment.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: About Us - Maps
Using maps like the one linked to this particular resource (I really just googled and chose the first link here given what this GLCE is calling for) have students identify various places on various maps on this page. Ideally you would use a map of your own school that is either online or hand drawn for the occasion, but this could get you started. This activity could hit reading standard 1 and reading standard 4 in Informational text.

1 - G1.0.4: Distinguish between landmasses and bodies of water using maps and globes.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Google Earth
Google Earth is a fantastic, free tool which can help bring the world alive to students. Using any collection of outline maps to begin the conversation then displaying Google Earth to the whole class, really hit home bodies of water and landmasses. Zoom to showcase differences. Discuss using examples from their maps and you're hitting Informational text standard 1.

1 - G2.0.1: Distinguish between physical (e.g., clouds, trees, weather) and human (e.g., buildings, playgrounds, sidewalks) characteristics of places.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Google Earth

Google Earth is a fantastic, free tool which can help bring the world alive to students. Showcase different areas of the world and use the map overlays to showcase physical characteristics and human characteristics. Discuss using examples from their maps and you're hitting Informational text standard 1.

1 - G5.0.1: Describe ways in which people modify (e.g., cutting down trees, building roads) and adapt to the environment (e.g., clothing, housing, transportation).

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 4 - How do we learn about the past?
1 - H2.0.1: Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among past, present, and future using family or school events.

1 - H2.0.2: Use a calendar to distinguish among days, weeks, and months.

1 - H2.0.3: Investigate a family history for at least two generations, identifying various members and their connections in order to tell a narrative about family life.

1 - H2.0.4: Retell in sequence important ideas and details from stories about families or schools.

1 - H2.0.5: Use historical records and artifacts (e.g., photos, diaries, oral histories, and videos) to draw possible conclusions about family or school life in the past.

1 - H2.0.6: Compare life today with life in the past using the criteria of family, school, jobs, or communication.

1 - H2.0.7: Identify the events or people celebrated during United States national holidays and why we celebrate them (e.g., Independence Day, Constitution Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day; Presidents’ Day).

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 5 - What is a Good Citizen?
1 - C1.0.1: Identify some reasons for rules in school (e.g., provide order, predictability, and safety).

1 - C1.0.2: Give examples of the use of power with authority in school (e.g., principal, teacher or bus driver enforcing school rules).

1 - C1.0.3: Give examples of the use of power without authority in school (e.g., types of bullying, taking cuts in line).

1 - C2.0.1: Explain how decisions can be made or how conflicts might be resolved in fair and just ways (e.g., majority rules).

1 - C2.0.2: Identify important symbols of the United States of America (e.g., Statue of Liberty, Uncle Sam, White House, Bald Eagle).

1 - C5.0.1: Describe some responsibilities people have at home and at school (e.g., taking care of oneself, respect for the rights of others, following rules, getting along with others).

1 - C5.0.2: Identify situations in which people act as good citizens in the school community (e.g., thoughtful and effective participation in the school decisions, respect for the rights of others, respect for rule of law, voting, volunteering, compassion, courage, honesty).

1 - P3.1.1: Identify public issues in the school community.

1 - P3.1.2: Use graphic data to analyze information about a public issue in the school community.

1 - P3.1.3: Identify alternative resolutions to a public issue in the school community.

1 - P3.3.1: Express a position on a public policy issue in the school community and justify the position with a reasoned argument.

1 - P4.2.1: Develop and implement an action plan to address or inform others about a public issue.

1 - P4.2.2: Participate in projects to help or inform others