To navigate this page, any available resources will appear as links below the Content Expectation. Please contact david.johnson@wmisd.org if you have a public domain resource which could be linked to one of these standards.

Vocabulary: The attached vocabulary list came from the Michigan Citizenship Collaborative Curriculum and should be covered throughout the course of the year if you're following the MC3 units.
"I Can" Statements The attached "I Can" statements were developed during the Wexford-Missaukee Intermediate School District curriculum review for Social Studies.

Common Core Writing Examples from Mason Lake Oceana ISD's Social Studies Network.

Common Core (College and Career Readiness Standards) for content literacy in Social Studies (through ELA standards)

assessment.jpgThere are Northern Michigan Learning Consortium Assessments available for some of these units. Please click here to learn more about how to access them.

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 1 - What is a community?

1 - G2.0.1: Distinguish between physical (e.g., clouds, trees, weather) and human (e.g., buildings, playgrounds, sidewalks) characteristics of places.

resource.jpgRESOURCE: Bens Guide to your Neighborhood
Use this resource to learn a little more about communities as a whole, then have students compare and contrast what they've learned here with their own community. What is alike and different? They could write about this and hit Writing Standard 2. Talking about the who, what, where, when, and why (who works here?) would help hit Informational Text Standard 1.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: There's No Place Like Home
If unable to follow this activity completely (no field trips out of the school) students could brainstorm a list of the major places in their community, then choose one off them to write about as a "tour guide". This would help hit CCRS Writing Standard 8.

2 - G2.0.1: Compare the physical and human characteristics of the local community with those of another community.

resource.jpgRESOURCE: Places in my Community
To satisfy this GLCE follow the lesson plan instructions but add in pictures of a secondary community. Informational Text standard 7 fits this lesson.


2 - G4.0.2: Describe the means people create for moving people, goods, and ideas within the local community.

resource.jpgRESOURCE: Blue Sky
This resource from Learning to Give is a good one to assess student knowledge of their own community. Completion of this activity can hit this GLCE, as well as Writing Standards 5, 6, 7, and 8.

2 - C1.0.1: Explain why people form governments.

resource.jpgRESOURCE: PBS Kids Go!

This page starts off with a small description of why we need a government, but then allows you to navigate through a virtual town and learn more about the various government buildings you might see. Students may play with this site, OR, teacher can guide practice. Either way, discussing this hits Reading Standard 1, describing what the pictures are saying and how they relate back to the overall idea will help hit Informational Text Standard 7. Writing an informative text in which they outline why we need government can hit writing standard 2.


folder.jpgMC3 Unit 2- Where is my community and what is it like there?


2 - G1.0.1: Construct maps of the local community that contain symbols, labels, and legends denoting human and natural characteristics of place.

2 - G1.0.2: Use maps to describe the spatial organization of the local community by applying concepts including relative location and using distance, direction, and scale.

2 - G2.0.1: Compare the physical and human characteristics of the local community with those of another community.

2 - G2.0.2: Describe how the local community is part of a larger region (e.g., county, metropolitan area, state.

2 - G4.0.1: Describe land use in the community (e.g., where people live, where services are provided, where products are made).

2 - G4.0.2: Describe the means people create for moving people, goods, and ideas within the local community.

2 - G5.0.1: Suggest ways people can responsibly interact with the environment in the local community.

2 - G5.0.2: Describe positive and negative consequences of changing the physical environment of the local community.


folder.jpgMC3 Unit 3- How do citizens live together in a community?

2 - C1.0.1: Explain why people form governments.

resource.jpgRESOURCE: PBS Kids Go!

This page starts off with a small description of why we need a government, but then allows you to navigate through a virtual town and learn more about the various government buildings you might see. Students may play with this site, OR, teacher can guide practice. Either way, discussing this hits Reading Standard 1, describing what the pictures are saying and how they relate back to the overall idea will help hit Informational Text Standard 7. Writing an informative text in which they outline why we need government can hit writing standard 2.


2 - C1.0.2: Distinguish between government action and private action.

2 - C2.0.1: Explain how local governments balance individual rights with the common good to solve local community problems.

2 - C2.0.2: Describe how the Pledge of Allegiance reflects the core democratic value of patriotism.

2 - C3.0.1: Give examples of how local governments make, enforce, and interpret laws (ordinances) in the local community.

2 - C3.0.2: Use examples to describe how local government affects the lives of its citizens.

2 - C3.0.3: Identify services commonly provided by local governments (e.g., police, fire

departments, schools, libraries, parks).

2 - G4.0.3: Use components of culture (e.g., foods, language, religion, traditions) to describe diversity in the local community.

2 - C5.0.1: Identify ways citizens participate in community decisions.

2 - C5.0.2: Distinguish between personal and civic responsibilities and explain why they are important in community life.


folder.jpgMC3 Unit 4- How do people work together in a community?

1 - E1.0.3: Using examples, explain why people cannot have everything they want (scarcity) and describe how people respond (choice).

2 - E1.0.1: Identify the opportunity cost involved in a consumer decision.

2 - E1.0.2: Identify businesses in the local community.

2 - E1.0.3: Describe how businesses in the local community meet economic wants of consumers.

2 - E1.0.4: Describe the natural, human, and capital resources needed for production of a good or service in a community.

2 - E1.0.5: Use examples to show that people cannot produce everything they want (specialization) and depend on trade with others to meet their wants.


folder.jpgMC3 Unit 5- How do communities change?

1 - H2.0.1: Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among past, present, and future using family or school events.

1 - H2.0.6: Compare life today with life in the past using the criteria of family, school, jobs, or communication.

2 - H2.0.1: Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among years and decades using a timeline of local community events.

2 - H2.0.2: Explain why descriptions of the same event in the local community can be different.

2 - H2.0.3: Use an example to describe the role of the individual in creating history.

2 - H2.0.4: Describe changes in the local community over time (e.g., types of businesses, architecture and landscape, jobs, transportation, population).

2 - H2.0.5: Identify a problem in a community’s past and describe how it was resolved.

2 - H2.0.6: Construct a historical narrative about the history of the local community from a variety of sources (e.g., data gathered from local residents, artifacts, photographs).

2 - G5.0.2: Describe positive and negative consequences of changing the physical environment of the local community.



folder.jpgMC3 Unit 6- How can a citizen affect a community?

2 - C5.0.1: Identify ways citizens participate in community decisions.

2 - C5.0.2: Distinguish between personal and civic responsibilities and explain why they are important in community life.

2 - C5.0.3: Design and participate in community improvement projects that help or inform others.

2 - P3.1.1: Identify public issues in the local community that influence the daily lives of its citizens.

2 - P3.1.2: Use graphic data and other sources to analyze information about a public issue in the local community and evaluate alternative resolutions.

2 - P3.1.3: Give examples of how conflicts over core democratic values lead people to differ on resolutions to a public policy issue in the local community.

2 - P3.3.1: Compose a statement expressing a position on a public policy issue in the local community and justify the position with a reasoned argument.

2 - P4.2.1: Develop and implement an action plan to address or inform others about a public issue.

2 - P4.2.2: Participate in projects to help or inform others.