To navigate this page, any available resources will appear as links below the Content Expectation. Please contact david.johnson@wmisd.org if you have a public domain resource which could be linked to one of these standards.
Vocabulary: The attached vocabulary list came from the Michigan Citizenship Collaborative Curriculum and should be covered throughout the course of the year if you're following the MC3 units.
"I Can" Statements The attached "I Can" statements were developed during the Wexford-Missaukee Intermediate School District curriculum review for Social Studies.

Common Core Writing Examples from Mason Lake Oceana ISD's Social Studies Network.
Common Core (College and Career Readiness Standards) for content literacy in Social Studies (through ELA standards)

Close and Critical Reading lesson for Harriet Tubman. CCRS Ready!

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 1 - The Geography of Michigan

2 - G2.0.2: Describe how the local community is part of a larger region (e.g., county, metropolitan area, state).
resource.jpgRESOURCE: National Geographic MapMaker
Use this map of Michigan to have students first, locate their city's relative location. From there, point out some of the other cities listed on the map. What do they already know about them? What can you guess about weather, climate, etc. from comparing your location to another in Michigan? (Reading Standard 3)

3 - G1.0.1: Use cardinal directions (north, south, east, west) to describe the relative location of significant places in the immediate environment.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Google Earth
Use Google Earth to zoom in on your home town. Move out to your state level and zoom in on another town. Using the state level view, quiz students on the location of other towns (east of us, west of us, north of us, south of us, etc.)
3 - G1.0.2: Use thematic maps to identify and describe the physical and human characteristics of Michigan.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Population Gains and Losses 1990-2000
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Family Household population Map 1990-2000
Have students take a look at one or both of these maps. Asking questions like "What counties have seen the greatest population loss over time?" etc. can have students meeting Reading Informatinoal Text standard 1.
3 - G2.0.1: Use a variety of visual materials and data sources to describe ways in which Michigan can be divided into regions.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: National Geographic MapMaker
Referring to this map (possibly once again if you used it for the GLCE above) would alliow you to discuss how Michigan is divided into regions. While obviously one could make the distinction between the upper and lower peninsula, how else could Michigan be divided up?

3 - G2.0.2: Describe different regions to which Michigan belongs (e.g., Great Lakes Region, Midwest).
3 - G4.0.3: Describe some of the current movements of goods, people, jobs or information to, from, or within Michigan and explain reasons for the movements.

3 - G5.0.1: Locate natural resources inMichigan and explain the consequences of their use.

3 - G5.0.2: Describe how people adapt to, use, and modify the natural resources of Michigan.

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 2 - The Economy of Michigan

3 - E1.0.1: Explain how scarcity, opportunity costs, and choices affect what is produced and consumed in Michigan.

3 - E1.0.2: Identify incentives (e.g., sales, tax breaks) that influence economic decisions people make in Michigan.

3 - E1.0.4: Describe how entrepreneurs combine natural, human, and capital resources to produce goods and services in Michigan.

3 - E1.0.5: Explain the role of business development in Michigan’s economic future.

3 - E2.0.1: Using a Michigan example, describe how specialization leads to increased interdependence (cherries grown in Michigan are sold in Florida; oranges grown in Florida are sold in Michigan).

3 - E3.0.1: Identify products produced in other countries and consumed by people in Michigan.

3 - G4.0.1: Describe major kinds of economic activity in Michigan today, such as agriculture (e.g., corn, cherries, dairy), manufacturing (e.g., automobiles, wood products), services and tourism, research and development (e.g., Automation Alley, life sciences corridor, university communities), and explain the factors influencing the location of these economic activities.

3 - C3.0.2: Identify goods and services provided by the state government and describe how they are funded (e.g., taxes, fees, fines).

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 3 - The Early History of Michigan

3 - H3.0.1: Identify questions historians ask in examining the past in Michigan (e.g., What happened? When did it happen? Who was involved? How and why did it happen?).
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Michigan History For Kids
An entire magazine from 2002 focused around Michigan History. Pull individual articles to hit a variety of the CCRS Reading Standards and Writing Standards (Depending on which ones you used.)

3 - H3.0.2: Explain how historians use primary and secondary sources to answer questions about the past.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Primary vs Secondary Sources
Use this website as a review/tool for teaching students the difference between the two. Move forward by having students bring in a "primary" and a "secondary" source from home.
3 – H3.0.3: Describe the causal relationships between three events in Michigan’s past (e.g., Erie Canal, more people came, statehood).

3 - H3.0.4: Draw upon traditional stories of American Indians (e.g., Anishinaabeg – Ojibway (Chippewa), Odawa (Ottawa), Potawatomi; Menominee; Huron Indians) who lived in Michigan in order to make generalizations about their beliefs.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Ojibwe Creation Story
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Ottowa Story of the Flood
resource.jpgRESOURCE: A Potawatomi Story
Using any of these stories in comparision with one another, students could (if asked to recall details from one another) hit Reading Standard 2. They could also be asked to dstinguish their own poitn of view from that of the narrator (Reading Standard 5)

3 - H3.0.5: Use informational text and visual data to compare how American Indians and settlers in the early history of Michigan adapted to, used, and modified their environment.

3 - H3.0.6: Use a variety of sources to describe interactions that occurred between American Indians and the first European explorers and settlers in Michigan.

3 - H3.0.7: Use a variety of primary and secondary sources to construct a historical narrative about daily life in the early settlements of Michigan (pre-statehood).
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Early Michigan History
This is a GREAT website with some accounts of early settlers to Michigan. Ask students to read some of these (or pick a few selections) and have them ask and answer questiosn to demonstrate their understanding, referring back to it for their answers (Reading Standard 1), Have some fun and write their own narrative pretending to be an early settler based off of what they have read by establishing a situation, using dialogue, be chronologically accurate, and provide some sense of closure at the end. (Writing Standard 3)
3 - H3.0.9: Describe how Michigan attained statehood.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Seeking Michigan: Michigan Statehood
An informational text piece which gives a brief account of statehood. Delve further into the site for historical documents. This is a good place to practice context clues (Reading 4), and use information gained from illustrations to demonstrate understanding of the text (Reading 7)
3 - H3.0.10: Create a timeline to sequence early Michigan history (American Indians, exploration, settlement, statehood).
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Early Michigan History
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Seeking Michigan: Michigan Statehood
Both of these resources from above can help with completion of this process standard. Completion of this standard also partially addresses reading Standard 2.
3 - G4.0.4: Use data and current information about the Anishinaabeg and other American Indians living in Michigan today to describe the cultural aspects of modern American Indian life.

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 4 - The Growth of Michigan

3 - E1.0.3: Analyze how Michigan’s location and natural resources influenced its economic development (e.g., how waterways and other natural resources have influenced economic activities such as mining, lumbering, automobile manufacturing, and furniture making). See also 4-H3.0.1 and 4 – H3.0.3.

3 – H3.0.1: Identify questions that historians ask in examining the past in Michigan (e.g., What happened? When did it happen? Who was involved? How and why did it happen?). See also 4-H3.0.1.

3 - G4.0.2: Describe diverse groups that have come into a region of Michigan and reasons why they came (push/pull factors). See also 4-H3.0.2.

3 - G4.0.4: Give an example of how another cultural group in Michigan today has preserved and built upon its cultural heritage (portions omitted). See also 4-H3.0.2 and 4-H3.0.7.

3 - E1.0.4: Describe how entrepreneurs combine natural, human, and capital resources to produce goods and services inMichigan.

4-H3.0.5: Use visual data and informational text or primary accounts to compare a major Michigan economic activity today with that same or a related activity in the past.

resource.jpgRESOURCE: Michigan Economic Activity
After having a talk about how to read charts or graphs, have students take a look at the graph only on the linked resource. Informational Text Standard 7 will be hit with a general discussion of Michigan's economic outlook over an 11 year period of time. You could also have a written component using Writing Standard 2 as a guide.

4-H3.0.6: Use a variety of primary and secondary sources to construct a historical narrative about the beginnings of the automobile industry and the labor movement in Michigan.

4- H3.0.8 Describe past and current threats to Michigan’s natural resources; describe how Michigan worked in the past and continues to work today to protect its natural resources.

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 5 - The Government of Michigan

3- C1.0.1: Give an example of howMichigan state government fulfills one of the purposes of government (e.g., protecting individual rights, promoting the common good, ensuring equal treatment under the law).

3- C2.0.1: Describe howMichigan state government reflects the principle of representative government.

3 - C3.0.1: Distinguish between the roles of state and local government.

3 - C3.0.3: Identify the three branches of state government in Michigan and the powers of each.

3 - C3.0.4: Explain how state courts function to resolve conflict.

3 - C3.0.5: Describe the purpose of the Michigan Constitution.

3 - C5.0.1: Identify rights (e.g., freedom of speech, freedom of religion, right to own property) and responsibilities of citizenship (e.g., respecting the rights of others, voting, obeying laws).

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 6 - Public Issues Facing Michigan Citizens

2 - P3.1.1: Identify public issues in the local community that influence the daily lives of its citizens.

3 - P3.1.1: Identify public issues in Michigan that influence the daily lives of its citizens.

3 - P3.1.2: Use graphic data and other sources to analyze information about a public issue in Michigan and evaluate alternative resolutions.

3 - P3.1.3: Give examples of how conflicts over core democratic values lead people to differ on resolutions to a public policy issue in Michigan.

3 - P3.3.1: Compose a paragraph expressing a position on a public policy issue in Michigan and justify the position with a reasoned argument.

3 - C5.0.1: Identify rights (e.g., freedom of speech, freedom of religion, right to own property) and responsibilities of citizenship (e.g., respecting the rights of others, voting, obeying laws).

3 - G5.0.1: Locate natural resources in Michigan and explain the consequences of their use.

3 - G5.0.2: Describe how people adapt to, use, and modify the natural resources of Michigan.