To navigate this page, any available resources will appear as links below the Content Expectation. Please contact david.johnson@wmisd.org
if you have a public domain resource which could be linked to one of these standards.

Vocabulary: The attached vocabulary list came from the Michigan Citizenship Collaborative Curriculum and should be covered throughout the course of the year if you're following the MC3 units.
"I Can" Statements The attached "I Can" statements were developed during the Wexford-Missaukee Intermediate School District curriculum review for Social Studies.

Common Core Writing Examples from Mason Lake Oceana ISD's Social Studies Network.
Common Core (College and Career Readiness Standards) for content literacy in Social Studies
assessment.jpgThere are Northern Michigan Learning Consortium Assessments available for some of these units. Please click here to learn more about how to access them.

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 1 - Geography of the Eastern Hemisphere


7 – G1.1.1: Explain and use a variety of maps, globes, and web based geography technology to study the world, including global, interregional, regional, and local scales.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Navigational Instruments
This link would be a great discussion piece for your students in terms of how maps were made, studied, and used both today and yesterday. A discussino like this hits CCRS Social Studies Standard 7. Students could also write about the advances of technology in relation to their studies of geography and thereby hit Social Studies Writing Standard 6.

resource.jpgRESOURCE: How Does GPS Work?
With GPS systems increasing in popularity, this site explains how they work. Good technical reading which covers CCRS Reading in Social Studies Standard 3.

7 – G1.1.2: Draw an accurate sketch map from memory of the Eastern Hemisphere showing the major regions (Africa, Asia, Europe, Australia/Oceania, Antarctica).
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Test your Geography Knowledge
Students may quiz themselves using this website.

7 – G1.2.1: Locate the major landforms, rivers and climate regions of the Eastern Hemisphere.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Globes and Multi-continent maps
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Blank Outline Maps
Any of these maps, when filled in can be used for a multitude of assignments centered around the CCRS. For example, discussing population settlements by referencing what has been filled in on the maps to determine where human settlements tend to creep up would hit reading standard 1, and if asked to write about it, writing standard 7. (You would need a few more sources, or reference materials such as your textbook to accomplish this)

7 – G1.2.3: Use observations from air photos, photographs (print and CD), films (VCR and DVD) as the basis for answering geographic questions about the human and physical characteristics of places and regions. See also 6 – G1.2.4.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: CIA - The World Factbook
The world Factbook contains a wealth of information on countries and could be used as the basis for a country research paper which would hit writing standard 7 (as long as more sources were intertwined)

7 – G1.2.4: Draw the general population distribution of the Eastern Hemisphere on a map, analyze the patterns, and propose two generalizations about the location and density of the population.

resource.jpgRESOURCE: CIA - The World Factbook
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Blank Outline Maps
Any of these maps, when filled in can be used for a multitude of assignments centered around the CCRS. For example, discussing population settlements by referencing what has been filled in on the maps to determine where human settlements tend to creep up would hit reading standard 1, and if asked to write about it, writing standard 7. (You would need a few more sources, or reference materials such as your textbook to accomplish this) The world Factbook contains a wealth of information on countries and could be used as the basis for a country research paper which would hit writing standard 7 (as long as more sources were intertwined)


7 – G1.2.5: Use information from modern technology such as Geographic Positioning System (GPS), Geographic Information System (GIS), and satellite remote sensing to locate information and process maps and data to analyze spatial patterns of the Eastern Hemisphere to answer geographic questions.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Google Earth
Google Earth could be installed on one or many computers (lab or small group settings) After teaching students how to access information on it, and how to use it, looking at specific countries. Using the maps and different geographic filters, students could answer questions based on evidence found through Google Earth (Reading 1, describe how the text presents information)

7 – G1.3.1: Use the fundamental themes of geography (location, place, human environment interaction, movement, region) to describe regions or places on earth. See also 6 – G1.3.1.

resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Five Themes of Geography - Review

7 –G1.3.2: Explain the locations and distributions of physical and human characteristics of Earth by using knowledge of spatial patterns. See also 6 – G1.3.2.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: CIA - The World Factbook
The world Factbook contains a wealth of information on countries and could be used as the basis for a country research paper which would hit writing standard 7 (as long as more sources were intertwined)

7 – G2.1.1: Describe the landform features and the climate of the region (within the Western or Eastern Hemispheres) under study.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: CIA - The World Factbook
The world Factbook contains a wealth of information on countries and could be used as the basis for a country research paper which would hit writing standard 7 (as long as more sources were intertwined)

7 – G2.1.2: Use information from GIS, remote sensing and the World Wide Web to compare and contrast the surface features and vegetation of the continents of the Eastern Hemisphere.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Vegetation Map
An informative essay could be built around this map and others which would hit (Writing Standard 2)

7 – G2.2.1: Describe the human characteristics of the region under study (including languages, religion, economic system, governmental system, cultural traditions).
resource.jpgRESOURCE: CIA - The World Factbook
For this GLCE students could write a report on the human characteristics of any particular region of study, using this site as a guide to begin. Hits Writing Standards 2, 4, 5

7 – G3.1.1: Construct and analyze climate graphs for two locations at different latitudes and elevations in the region to answer geographic questions and make predictions based on patterns. (e.g., compare and contrast Norway and France, Nairobi and Kilimanjaro, Mumbai and New Delhi).

resource.jpgRESOURCE: Weather Forecast Map
This resource allows you to pick and choose any region in the world. Graphs can then be created using Excel, Numbers, Quattro Pro, or by hand. A comparison writing can be written based off of the information in student provided graphs. You could also mix it up and have students write on another student's climate graph. (Writing Standard 2)
7 – G4.3.1: Identify places in the Eastern Hemisphere that have been modified to be suitable for settlement by describing the modifications that were necessary (e.g., Nile River irrigation, reclamation of land along the North Sea, planting trees in areas that have become desertified in Africa).
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Desertification
A great linking resource to describe what Desertification is. Suitable for text complexity requirements. If students have trouble with words in this article, a quick lesson on context clues with this article would help satisfy CCRS Social Studies Reading Standard 4. Determining Central Ideas or information in a secondary source and accurately summarize? CCRS Social Studies Reading Standard 2

7 – G4.3.2: Describe patterns of settlement by using historical and modern maps (e.g., the location of the world’s mega cities, other cities located near coasts and navigable rivers, regions under environmental stress such as the Sahel).
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Human Populations
While the other data on the page is useful as well, the true useful tool for this GLCE lies in the first graphic, which, when clicked through, shows how population density changes over time (across the world.) This would be a great writing assignment if students had another outline map that showed things like natural resources, waterways, etc. Students could write an informative piece which describes how human settlements cropped up in the various regions they are studying. (Writing Standard 1)

7 – G5.2.1: Describe the effects that a change in the physical environment could have on human activities and the choices people would have to make in adjusting to the change (e.g., drought in Africa, pollution from volcanic eruptions in Indonesia, earthquakes in Turkey, and flooding in Bangladesh).
resource.jpgRESOURCE: African Drought Endangers Millions
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Hundreds Dead as Quake Shakes Turkey
resource.jpgRESOURCE: At Least 25 Killed as Indonesian Volcano Erupts
resource.jpgRESOURCE: South Asia Bangledesh Floods Rise Again
All of these articles deal with a problem that has changed the physical environment, and the after effects the people in the area feel. Several of them have complex vocabulary which can hit Reading Standard 4. Discussing the central ideas (how human life is interrupted and changed by a natural disaster for example) hits Reading Standard 2. Writing about this topic hits Writing Standard 1


folder.jpgMC3 Unit 2 - Africa: People, Places, and Issues

7 – H1.4.2: Describe and use themes of history to study patterns of change and continuity. See also 6 – H1.4.2.


7 – G1.1.1: Explain and use a variety of maps, globes, and web based geography technology to study the world, including global, interregional, regional, and local scales.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Globes and Multi-continent maps
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Blank Outline Maps
The same resources listed in Unit 1, only in this case, you get specific with Africa. Any of these maps, when filled in, can be used for a multitude of assignments centered around the CCRS. For example, discussing population settlements by referencing what has been filled in on the maps to determine where human settlements tend to creep up would hit reading standard 1, and if asked to write about it, writing standard 7. (You would need a few more sources, or reference materials such as your textbook to accomplish this)

7 – G1.2.6: Apply the skills of geographic inquiry (asking geographic questions, acquiring geographic information, organizing geographic information, analyzing geographic information, and answering geographic questions) to analyze a problem or issue of importance to a region of the Eastern Hemisphere . See also 6 – G1.2.6.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Conflicts in Africa
This website contains a lot of useful issues in Africa in a small overview format (beyond just conflicts) which could be used as the basis for a research writing (Writing Standards 5-8)

7 – G1.3.1: Use the fundamental themes of geography (location, place, human environment interaction, movement, region) to describe regions or places on earth. See also 6 – G1.3.1.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: CIA - The World Factbook
Using information from the World Factbook, students could be invited to write an essay which discusses the five themes of geography based on one country in Africa. Students would be able to use this site as a resource for writing their projects, which would hit writing standards 5-8 depending on complexity.

7 –G1.3.3: Explain the different ways in which places are connected and how those connections demonstrate interdependence and accessibility.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The African Union (Wikipedia)
An overview on how different African countries cooperate through a larger organization. Students could research this and write an argumentative piece about strengthening or weakening the role of the African Union using information from here and other sources. (Writing Standard 1)

7 – G2.1.1: Describe the landform features and the climate of the region (within the Western or Eastern Hemispheres) under study.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: African Landforms (World Atlas)
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Africa Environments Climates
Both of the resources above could be used for information to write a short research paper describing the climate or landform features of Africa, or a specialized region. (Writing Standard 7)

7 – G2.2.1: Describe the human characteristics of the region under study (including languages, religion, economic system, governmental system, cultural traditions).

7 – G4.1.1: Identify and explain examples of cultural diffusion within the Eastern Hemisphere (e.g., the spread of sports, music, architecture, television, Internet, Bantu languages in Africa, Islam in Western Europe).

7 – G4.1.2: Compare roles of women in traditional African societies in the past with roles of women as modern micro-entrepreneurs in current economies.

7 – G4.4.1: Identify factors that contribute to conflict and cooperation between and among cultural groups (e.g., natural resources, power, culture, wealth).

7 – G5.1.1: Describe the environmental effects of human action on the atmosphere (air), biosphere (people, animals, and plants), lithosphere (soil), and hydrosphere (water) (e.g., desertification of the Sahel Region of North Africa, deforestation of the Congo Basin, air pollution in urban center, and chemical spills in European Rivers). See also 6 – G5.1.1.

7 – G5.1.2 Describe how variations in technology affect human modifications of the landscape (e.g., clearing of agricultural land in Southeast Asia, fish factories in North Atlantic and Western Pacific Ocean, and damming rivers to meet needs for electricity). See also 6 – G5.1.2.

7 – C1.1.1: Explain how the purposes served by government affect relationships between the individual, government, and society as a whole and the differences that occur in monarchies, theocracies, dictatorships, and representative governments.

7 – C4.3.2: Explain the challenges to governments and the cooperation needed to address international issues in the Eastern Hemisphere (e.g., migration and human rights).

7 – C4.3.3: Explain why governments belong to different types of international and regional organizations (e.g., United Nations (UN), North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), European Union (EU), and African Union (AU), G-8 countries (leading economic/political)).

7 – E3.1.1: Explain the importance of trade (imports and exports) on national economies in the Eastern Hemisphere (e.g., natural gas in North Africa, petroleum Africa, mineral resources in Asia).

7 – E3.3.1: Explain and compare how economic systems (traditional, command, and market) answer four basic questions: What should be produced? How will it be produced? How will it be distributed? Who will receive the benefits of production? (e.g., market economies in Africa, Europe; command economy inNorth Korea; and the transition to market economies inVietnam andChina).

7 – P3.1.1: Clearly state an issue as a question or public policy, trace the origins of an issue, analyze various perspectives, and generate and evaluate alternative resolutions. Deeply examine policy issues in group discussions and debates to make reasoned and informed decisions. Write persuasive/ argumentative essays expressing and justifying decisions on public policy issues. Plan and conduct activities intended to advance views on matters of public policy, report the results, and evaluate effectiveness.
  • Identify public policy issues related to global topics and issues studied.
  • Clearly state the issue as a question of public policy orally or in written form.
  • Use inquiry methods to acquire content knowledge and appropriate data about the issue.
  • Identify the causes and consequences and analyze the impact, both positive and negative.
  • Share and discuss findings of research and issue analysis in group discussions and debates.
  • Compose a persuasive essay justifying the position with a reasoned argument.
  • Develop an action plan to address or inform others about the issue at the local to global scales.

7 – P4.2.1: Demonstrate knowledge if how, when, and where individuals would plan and conduct activities to advance views in matters of public policy, report the results, and evaluate effectiveness. See also 6 – P4.2.1.

7 – P4.2.2: Engage in activities intended to contribute to solving a national or international problem studied. See also 6 – P4.2.2.

7 – P4.2.3: Participate in projects to help or inform others (e.g., service learning projects).

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 4 - East Asia: People, Places, and Issues

7 – H1.4.2: Describe and use themes of history to study patterns of change and continuity. See also 6 – H1.4.2.

7 – G1.1.1: Explain and use a variety of maps, globes, and web based geography technology to study the world, including global, interregional, regional, and local scales.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Globes and Multi-continent maps
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Blank Outline Maps
The same resources listed in Unit 1, only in this case, you get specific to East Asia. Any of these maps, when filled in, can be used for a multitude of assignments centered around the CCRS. For example, discussing population settlements by referencing what has been filled in on the maps to determine where human settlements tend to creep up would hit reading standard 1, and if asked to write about it, writing standard 7. (You would need a few more sources, or reference materials such as your textbook to accomplish this)

7 – G1.2.4: Draw the general population distribution of the Eastern Hemisphere on a map, analyze the patterns, and propose two generalizations about the location and density of the population.

7 – G1.2.6: Apply the skills of geographic inquiry (asking geographic questions, acquiring geographic information, organizing geographic information, analyzing geographic information, and answering geographic questions) to analyze a problem or issue of importance to a region. See also 6 – G1.2.6.

7 –G1.3.2: Explain the locations and distributions of physical and human characteristics of Earth by using knowledge of spatial patterns.

7 – G2.1.1: Describe the landform features and the climate of the region (within the Western or Eastern Hemispheres) under study.

7 – G4.1.1: Identify and explain examples of cultural diffusion within the Eastern Hemisphere (e.g., the spread of sports, music, architecture, television, Internet, Bantu languages in Africa, Islam inWestern Europe).

7 – G4.3.1 Identify places in the Eastern Hemisphere that have been modified to be suitable for settlement by describing the modifications that were necessary (e.g., Nile River irrigation, reclamation of land along the North Sea, planting trees in areas that have become desertified in Africa).

7 – G4.3.2: Describe patterns of settlement by using historical and modern maps (e.g., the location of the world’s mega cities, other cities located near coasts and navigable rivers, regions under environmental stress such as the Sahel).

7 – G4.4.1: Identify factors that contribute to conflict and cooperation between and among cultural groups (control/use of natural resources, power, wealth, and cultural diversity).

7 – G5.1.1: Describe the environmental effects of human action on the atmosphere (air), biosphere (people, animals, and plants), lithosphere (soil), and hydrosphere (water) (e.g., changes in the tropical forest environments in Brazil, Peru, and Costa Rica). See also 6 – G5.1.1.

7 – G5.1.3: Identify the ways in which human-induced changes in the physical environment in one place can cause changes in other places (e.g., cutting forests in one region may result in river basin flooding elsewhere as has happened historically in China; building dams floods land upstream and permits irrigation downstream as in Southern Africa, the Aswan Dam flooded the upper Nile Valley and permitted irrigation downstream).

7 – C1.1.1: Explain how the purposes served by government affect relationships between the individual, government, and society as a whole and the differences that occur in monarchies, theocracies, dictatorships, and representative governments.

7 – C3.6.1: Define the characteristics of a nation-state (a specific territory, clearly defined boundaries, citizens, and jurisdiction over people who reside there, laws, and government) and how Eastern Hemisphere nations interact.

7 – C4.3.2: Explain the challenges to governments and the cooperation needed to address international issues in theEastern Hemisphere (e.g., migration and human rights).

7 – E2.3.1: Explain how national governments make decisions that impact both that country and other countries that use its resources (e.g., sanctions and tariffs enacted by a national government to prevent imports, most favored trade agreements, the impact China is having on the global economy and the U.S. economy in particular).

7 – E3.1.1: Explain the importance of trade (imports and exports) on national economies in the Eastern Hemisphere (e.g., natural gas in North Africa, petroleum Africa, mineral resources in Asia).

7 – E3.1.4: Explain how communications innovations have affected economic interactions and where and how people work (e.g., internet home offices, international work teams, international companies). See also 6 – E3.1.4.

7 – E3.3.1: Explain and compare how economic systems (traditional, command, and market) answer four basic questions: What should be produced? How will it be produced? How will it be distributed? Who will receive the benefits of production? (e.g., market economies in Africa, Europe; command economy inNorth Korea; and the transition to market economies inVietnam andChina).

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 5 - Era I: The Beginnings of HUman Society: Beginnings to 4000 BCE

7 – H1.1.1: Explain why and how historians use eras and periods as constructs to organize and explain human activities over time. See also 6 – H1.1.1.

7 – H1.1.2: Compare and contrast several different calendar systems used in the past and present and their cultural significance (e.g., Olmec and Mayan calendar systems, Aztec Calendar Stone, Sun Dial, Gregorian calendar – B.C. /A.D.; contemporary secular – B.C.E. /C.E.; Chinese, Hebrew, and Islamic/Hijri calendars). See also 6 – H1.1.2.

7 – H1.2.1: Explain how historians use a variety of sources to explore the past (e.g., artifacts, primary and secondary sources including narratives, technology, historical maps, visual/mathematical quantitative data, radiocarbon dating, DNA analysis). See also 6 – H1.2.1.

7 – H1.2.5: Describe how historians use methods of inquiry to identify cause effect relationships in history noting that many have multiple causes.

7 – H1.4.2: Describe and use themes of history to study patterns of change and continuity. See also 6 – H1.4.2.

7 – W1.1.1: Explain how and when human communities populated major regions of the Earth and adapted to a variety of environments. See also 6 – W1.1.1.
7 – W1.1.2: Explain what archaeologists have learned about Paleolithic and Neolithic patterns of living in Africa, Western Europe, and Asia.

7 – W1.2.1: Explain the importance of the natural environment in the development of agricultural settlements in different locations (e.g., available water for irrigation, adequate precipitation, and suitable growth season). See also 6 – W1.2.2.

7 – W1.2.2: Explain the impact of the Agricultural Revolution (stable food supply, surplus, population growth, trade, division of labor, development of settlements). See also 6 – W1.2.3.

7 – W2.1.1: Describe the importance of the development of human language, oral and written, and its relationship to the development of culture
  • verbal vocalizations
  • standardization of physical (rock, bird) and abstract (love, fear) words
pictographs to abstract writing (governmental administration, laws, codes, history and artistic expressions)

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 6 - Era II: Early Civilizations and the Emergence of Pastoral Peoples: 4000-1000 BCE

7 – H1.2.4: Compare and evaluate competing historical perspectives about the past based on proof. See also 6 – H1.2.4.

7 – H1.4.1: Describe and use cultural institutions to study an era and a region (political, economic, religion/ belief, science/technology, written language, education, family). See also 6 – H1.4.1.

7 – H1.4.3: Use historical perspectives to analyze global issues faced by humans long ago and today. See also 6 – H1.4.3.

7 – W1.2.3: Compare and contrast the environmental, economic, and social institutions of two early civilizations from different world regions (e.g., Yangtse, Indus River Valley, Tigris/Euphrates, and Nile).

7 – W2.1.2: Use historical and modern maps and other sources to locate, describe, and analyze major river systems and discuss the ways these physical settings supported permanent settlements, and development of early civilizations (Tigris and Euphrates Rivers, Yangtze River, Nile River, Indus River).

7 – W2.1.3: Examine early civilizations to describe their common features (ways of governing, stable food supply, economic and social structures, use of resources and technology, division of labor and forms of communication).

7 – W2.1.4: Define the concept of cultural diffusion and how it resulted in the spread of ideas and technology from one region to another (e.g., plants, crops, plow, wheel, bronze metallurgy).

7 – W2.1.5: Describe pastoralism and explain how the climate and geography of Central Asia were linked to the rise of pastoral societies on the steppes.

7 – G6.1.2: Conduct research on global topics and issues, compose persuasive essays, and develop a plan for action. See also 6 – G6.1.2.

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 7 - Era III: Classical Traditions and Major Empires 1000 BCE - 300 CE

7 – H1.2.6: Identify the role of the individual in history and the significance of one person’s ideas. See also 6 – H1.2.5.

7 – W3.1.1: Describe the characteristics that classical civilizations share (institutions, cultural styles, systems of thought that influenced neighboring peoples and have endured for several centuries).

7 – W3.1.2: Using historic and modern maps, locate three major empires of this era, describe their geographic characteristics including physical features and climates, and propose a generalization about the relationship between geographic characteristics and the development of early empires.

7 – W3.1.3: Compare and contrast the defining characteristics of a city-state, civilization, and empire.

7 – W3.1.4: Assess the importance of Greek ideas about democracy and citizenship in the development of Western political thought and institutions.

7 – W3.1.5: Describe major achievements from Indian, Chinese, Mediterranean, African, and Southwest and Central Asian civilizations in the areas of art, architecture and culture; science, technology and mathematics; political life and ideas; philosophy and ethical beliefs; and military strategy.

7 – W3.1.6: Use historic and modern maps to locate and describe trade networks among empires in the classical era.

7 – W3.1.7: Use a case study to describe how trade integrated cultures and influenced the economy within empires (e.g., Assyrian and Persian trade networks or networks of Egypt and Nubia/Kush; or Phoenician and Greek networks).

7 – W3.1.8: Describe the role of state authority, military power, taxation systems, and institutions of coerced labor, including slavery, in building and maintaining empires (e.g., Han Empire, Mauryan Empire, Egypt, Greek city-states and the Roman Empire).

7 – W3.1.9: Describe the significance of legal codes, belief systems, written languages and communications in the development of large regional empires.

7 – W3.1.10: Create a time line that illustrates the rise and fall of classical empires during the classical period. See also 6 – W3.1.5.

7 – C1.1.1: Explain how the purposes served by government affect relationships between the individual, government, and society as a whole and the differences that occur in monarchies, theocracies, dictatorships, and representative governments.

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 8 - Era III: World Religions

7 – H1.2.6: Identify the role of the individual in history and the significance of one person’s ideas. See also 6 – H1.2.5.

7 – H1.4.1: Describe and use cultural institutions to study an era and a region (political, economic, religion/ belief, science/technology, written language, education, family). See Also 6 – H1.4.1.

7 – W3.2.1: Identify and describe the beliefs of the five major world religions.

7 – W3.2.2: Locate the geographical center of major religions and map the spread through the 3rd century C.E.

7 – W3.2.3: Identify and describe the ways that religions unified people’s perceptions of the world and contributed to cultural integration of large regions of Afro-Eurasia.