To navigate this page, any available resources will appear as links below the Content Expectation. Please contact david.johnson@wmisd.org
if you have a public domain resource which could be linked to one of these standards.

Vocabulary: The attached vocabulary list came from the Michigan Citizenship Collaborative Curriculum and should be covered throughout the course of the year if you're following the MC3 units.

"I Can" Statements The attached "I Can" statements were developed during the Wexford-Missaukee Intermediate School District curriculum review for Social Studies.

Common Core Writing Examples from Mason Lake Oceana ISD's Social Studies Network.
Common Core (College and Career Readiness Standards) for content literacy in Social Studies.

assessment.jpgThere are Northern Michigan Learning Consortium Assessments available for some of these units. Please click here to learn more about how to access them.

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 1 - Foundations of the New Nation

8 – U3.3.7: Using important documents (e.g., Mayflower Compact, Common Sense, Declaration of Independence, Northwest Ordinance, Federalists Papers), describe the historical and philosophical origins of constitutional government in the United States using the ideas of social compact limited government, natural rights, right of revolution, separation of powers, bicameralism, republicanism, and popular participation in government.

resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Mayflower Compact
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Common Sense
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Declaration of Independence
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Northwest Ordinance
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Federalist Papers
Each of the above resources cover text complexity to various degrees. If a reading of one portion (some of these are very long) includes a discussion on the central ideas presented in the text, it covers CCRS Reading Standard 2. A discussion on the author (or authors) point of view or purpose covers CCRS Reading Standard 6. A carefully developed essay (informative) that discusses the ideals in one or more of these documents could cover CCRS Writing Standard 2.

8 - F1.1: Describe the ideas, experiences, and interactions that influenced the colonists’ decisions to declare independence by analyzing

  • colonial ideas about government (e.g., limited government, republicanism, protecting individual rights and promoting the common good, representative government, natural rights)

  • experiences with self-government (e.g., House of Burgesses and town meetings)

  • changing interactions with the royal government of Great Britain after the French and Indian War.

resource.jpgREMC RESOURCE: Johnny Tremain
You will need a REMC login and password to request these materials. Search for "Johnny Tremain." The bookset which contains a classroom set of books can be used in an English Classroom, OR...in a history classroom, the speech delivered by James Otis at the end of Chapter 8 is a powerful recreation of one he might have given during the time period. Either way, a reading and discussion of this book or chapter can, if crafted properly be used for CCRS Reading Standards 1, and 2, and depending on how much extra time is devoted to this, Reading Standard 8 can be used for a discussion on the relevance and accuracy of the text. If you run into any problems accessing this resource, or need your REMC login, please call (231) 876-2270.

8 - F1.2: Using the Declaration of Independence, including the grievances at the end of the document, describe the role this document played in expressing

  • colonists’ views of government

    • their reasons for separating from Great Britain.

resource.jpgRESOURCE: Declaration of Independence
This GLCE is fairly straightforward with what you could do to support CCRS. Writing a brief essay describing how the Declaration of Independence played a role in expressing the views of government and the reasons why they separated could technically hit CCRS Writing Standard 4.
CCRS Ready Lesson Plan: The Declaration of Independence, a Close and Critical Reading

8 - F1.3: Describe the consequences of the American Revolution by analyzing the

  • birth of an independent republican government

  • creation of Articles of Confederation

  • changing views on freedom and equality

  • and concerns over distribution of power within [and between] governments, between government and the governed, and among people.


resource.jpgRESOURCE: Independence and the Articles of Confederation
This resource is an overview on the Declaration of Independence and the Articles of Confederation. It could be used with CCRS Standard 3 alongside a class discussion on why the Articles ultimately were replaced by the Constitution.

8 – U3.3.1: Explain the reasons for the adoption and subsequent failure of the Articles of Confederation (e.g., why its drafters created a weak central government, challenges the nation faced under the Articles, Shays’ Rebellion, disputes over western land).


resource.jpgRESOURCE: Independence and the Articles of Confederation
This resource is an overview on the Declaration of Independence and the Articles of Confederation. It could be used with CCRS Standard 3 alongside a class discussion on why the Articles ultimately were replaced by the Constitution.

8 – U3.3.2: Identify [the major] economic and political questions facing the nation during the period of the Articles of Confederation and the opening of the Constitutional Convention.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Why did the Articles of Confederation Fail?
As a general overview, the this article can be used for students to determine what the exact economic and political questions the first Americans faced were. This would hit CCRS Reading Standard 2.

8 – U3.3.3: Describe the major issues debated at the Constitutional Convention including distribution of political power, conduct of foreign affairs, rights of individuals, rights of states, election of the executive, and slavery.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Constitutional Convention
This resource presents an overview of some of the major issues debated at the Constitutional convention. Farther down on the page however are some quotes from people who were there regarding the convention itself. Using these quotes and not the rest of the passage would be a good way to practice CCRS Reading Standard 2.

8 – U3.3.4: Explain how the new constitution resolved (or compromised) the major issues including sharing, separating, and checking of power among federal government institutions, dual sovereignty (state-federal power) rights of individuals, the Electoral College the Three-Fifths Compromise, and the Great Compromise.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: U.S. Electoral College, Official - About the Electoral College
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Three Fifths Compromise
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Great Compromise
All of these sites, which cover different topics, could be used in a discussion of how the constitution resolved some of the major issues facing the early Americans. Following a discussion on this, an excellent activity would be to write about that very question: How did the Constitution resolve some of the major issues of the day, and what was left unresolved? This would hit CCRS Writing Standards 7, 8, and 9

8 – U3.3.5: Analyze the debates over the ratification of the Constitution from the perspectives of Federalists and Anti-Federalists and describe how the states ratified the Constitution.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Federalists and Antifederalists
This site is concise, and when used with the GLCE above, could enhance the same paper mentioned above and hit the same standards.

8 – U3.3.6: Explain how the Bill of Rights reflected the concept of limited government, protections of basic freedoms, and the fear of many Americans of a strong central government.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Bill of Rights: unenumerated Rights
The first two paragraphs of this sum this GLCE up nicely, and leave the door open to determine things like: Author's bias and point of view (reading Standard 6) Central Ideas (reading standard 2), or a writing prompt (the questions within the text offer opportunities).

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 2 - Challenges to an Emerging Nation

8 – U4.1.1: Washington’s Farewell – Use Washington’s Farewell Address to analyze the most significant challenges the new nation faced and the extent to which subsequent Presidents heeded Washington’s advice.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Washington's Farewell Address
This resource lends itself nicely to a close and critical examination. By analyzing what is being said and supporting claims with textual evidence you hit Reading Standard 1. Spending time determining the central ideas of this primary source hits Reading Standard 2. This also lends itself to studying author's purpose (Reading Standard 6)

8 – U4.1.2: Establishing America’s Place in the World – Explain the changes in America’s relationships with other nations by analyzing treaties with American Indian nations, the French Revolution, Jay’s Treaty (1795), Pinckney’s Treaty (1795), Louisiana Purchase (1803), War of 1812, Transcontinental Treaty (1819), and the Monroe Doctrine (1823).

resource.jpgRESOURCE: Jay's Treaty
The full text of this treaty is very long so pick a portion of it. Asking students why the treaty itself was so controversial for colonists (and having them list evidence from the portion you give as their reasons) would hit Reading Standard 1.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Pinkney's Treaty
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Lousiana Purchase
Again, the full text of these treaties is very long so pick a portion. Having students identify however why this was so important (and often overlooked) and again backing up with evidence from the treaty itself would hit Reading Standard 1.

8 – U4.1.3: Challenge of Political Conflict – Explain how political parties emerged out of the competing ideas, experiences, and fears of Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton (and their followers), despite the worries the Founders had concerning the dangers of political division, by analyzing disagreements over
  • relative power of the national government (e.g., Whiskey Rebellion, Alien and Sedition Acts)
  • foreign relations (e.g., French Revolution, relations with Great Britain)
  • economic policy (e.g., the creation of a national bank, assumption of revolutionary debt).

8 – U4.1.4: Establishing a National Judiciary and Its Power – Explain the development of the power of the Supreme Court through the doctrine of judicial review as manifested in Marbury v. Madison (1803) and the role of Chief Justice John Marshall and the Supreme Court in interpreting the power of the national government (e.g., McCullouch v. Maryland, Dartmouth College v. Woodward, Gibbons v. Ogden).

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 3 - Regional and Economic Growth

8 – U4.2.1: Comparing the Northeast and the South – Compare and contrast the social and economic systems of the Northeast and the South with respect to geography and climate and the development of
  • agriculture, including changes in productivity, technology, supply and demand, and price
  • industry, including entrepreneurial development of new industries, such as textiles
  • the labor force including labor incentives and changes in labor forces
  • transportation including changes in transportation (steamboats and canal barges) and impact on economic markets and prices
  • immigration and the growth of nativism
  • race relations
  • class relations.

8 – U4.2.2: Institution of Slavery – Explain the ideology of the institution of slavery, its policies, and consequences.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Slave Narratives: Voices and Faces from the LOC.GOV Collection
Using this collection have students explore what some of the "Voices" of slavery were...their viewpoints, what they wanted, etc. This presents an excellent time to have students write about slavery from a broad perspective using information from the textbook, the narratives, etc. By introducing a claim (depending on how you set it up) supporting claims with evidence and logical reasoning, etc. you will hit Writing Standard 1.

8 – U4.2.3: Westward Expansion– Explain the [physical] expansion [of the United States] and the conquest and settlement of the West through the Louisiana Purchase, the removal of American Indians (Trail of Tears) from their native lands, the growth of a system of commercial agriculture, and the idea of Manifest Destiny.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: National Geographic - Go West Across America with Lewis and Clark!
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Westeward Expansion: The Louisiana Purchase
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Effects of Removal on American Indians
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Manifest Destiny (ushistory.org)

8 – U4.2.4: Consequences of Expansion – Develop an argument based on evidence about the positive and negative consequences of territorial and economic expansion on American Indians, the institution of slavery, and the relations between free and slaveholding states.
resource.jpgThis GLCE is essential Common Core ready. Look at Writing Standards 1 and 2 for specific direction.

8– U4.1.2: Establishing America’s Place in the World – Explain the changes in America’s relationships with other nations by analyzing treaties with American Indian nations, Jay’s Treaty (1795), French Revolution, Pinckney’s Treaty (1795), Louisiana Purchase, War of 1812, Transcontinental Treaty (1819), the Monroe Doctrine, [acquisition of Oregon country and the Mexican War].
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Jay's Treaty
The full text of this treaty is very long so pick a portion of it. Asking students why the treaty itself was so controversial for colonists (and having them list evidence from the portion you give as their reasons) would hit Reading Standard 1.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Pinkney's Treaty
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Lousiana Purchase
Again, the full text of these treaties is very long so pick a portion. Having students identify however why this was so important (and often overlooked) and again backing up with evidence from the treaty itself would hit Reading Standard 1.

HS - F1.1: Analyze the ways that American society moved toward and/or away from its core ideals found in foundational documents (e.g., Declaration of Independence, U.S. Constitution, Bill of Rights).

resource.jpgThis GLCE is essential Common Core ready. Look at Writing Standards 1 and 2 for specific direction. Writing Standard 7 is also applicable.


folder.jpgMC3 Unit 4 - Antebellum Reform Movements

8 – U4.3.1: Explain the origins of the American education system and Horace Mann’s campaign for free compulsory public education.

8 – U4.3.2: Describe the formation and development of the abolitionist movement by considering the roles of key abolitionist leaders (e.g., John Brown and armed resistance, Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad, Sojourner Truth, William Lloyd Garrison, and Frederick Douglass), and the response of southerners and northerners to the abolitionist movement.

8 – U4.3.3: Analyze the antebellum women’s rights (including suffrage) movement by discussing the goals of its leaders (e.g., Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton) and comparing the Seneca Falls Resolution with the Declaration of Independence.

8 – U4.3.4: Analyze the goals and effects of the antebellum temperance movement.

8 – U4.3.5: Evaluate the role of religion in shaping antebellum reform movements.

8 – P3.1.1: Identify, research, analyze, discuss, and defend a position on a national public policy issue.
  • Identify a national public policy issue.
  • Clearly state the issue as a question of public policy orally or in written form.
  • Use inquiry methods to trace the origins of the issue and to acquire data about the issue.
  • Generate and evaluate alternative resolutions to the public issue and analyze various perspectives (causes, consequences, positive and negative impact) on the issue.
  • Identify and apply core democratic values or constitutional principles.
  • Share and discuss findings of research and issue analysis in group discussions and debates.
  • Compose a persuasive essay justifying the position with a reasoned argument.
  • Develop an action plan to address or inform others about the issue.

8 – P4.2.1: Demonstrate knowledge of how, when, and where individuals would plan and conduct activities intended to advance views in matters of public policy, report the results, and evaluate effectiveness.

8 – P4.2.2: Engage in activities intended to contribute to solving a national or international problem studied.

8 – P4.2.3: Participate in projects to help or inform others (e.g., service learning projects).

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 5 - The Coming of the Civil War

8 – U5.1.1: Explain the differences in the lives of free blacks (including those who escaped from slavery) with the lives of free whites and enslaved peoples.

8 – U5.1.2: Describe the role of the Northwest Ordinance and its effect on the banning of slavery (e.g., the establishment of Michigan as a free state).

8 – U5.1.3: Describe the competing views of Calhoun, Webster, and Clay on the nature of the union among the states (e.g., sectionalism, nationalism, federalism, states’ rights).

8 – U5.1.4: Describe how the following increased sectional tensions
• the Missouri Compromise (1820)
• the Wilmot Proviso (1846)
• the Compromise of 1850 including the Fugitive Slave Act
• the Kansas-Nebraska Act (1854) and subsequent conflict in Kansas
• the Dred Scott v. Sandford decision (1857)
• changes in the party system (e.g., the death of the Whig party, rise of the Republican party and division of the Democratic party).

8 – U5.1.5: Describe the resistance of enslaved people (e.g., Nat Turner, Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad, John Brown, Michigan’s role in the Underground Railroad) and effects of their actions before and during the Civil War.)

8 – U5.1.6: Describe how major issues debated at the Constitutional Convention such as disagreements over the distribution of political power, rights of individuals (liberty and property), rights of states, election of the executive, and slavery help explain the Civil War.

8 – U5.2.1: Explain the reasons (political, economic, and social) why Southern states seceded and explain the differences in the timing of secession in the Upper and Lower South.

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 6 - The Civil War

8 – U5.2.2: Make an argument to explain the reasons why the North won the Civil War by considering the
• critical events and battles in the war
• the political and military leadership of the North and South
• the respective advantages and disadvantages, including geographic, demographic, economic and technological

8 – U5.2.3: Examine Abraham Lincoln’s presidency with respect to
• his military and political leadership
• the evolution of his emancipation policy (including the Emancipation Proclamation)
• and the role of his significant writings and speeches, including the Gettysburg Address and its relationship to the Declaration of Independence.

resource.jpgRESOURCE: Engage NY Gettysburg Address Close and Critical Reading Exemplar

This exemplar is already CCRS ready!

8 – U5.2.4: Describe the role of African Americans in the war, including black soldiers and regiments, and the increased resistance of enslaved peoples.
8 – U5.2.5: Construct generalizations about how the war affected combatants, civilians (including the role of women), the physical environment, and the future of warfare, including technological developments.

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 7 - Reconstruction


8 – U5.3.1: Describe the different positions concerning the reconstruction of Southern society and the nation, including the positions of President Abraham Lincoln, President Andrew Johnson, Republicans, and African Americans.

8 – U5.3.2: Describe the early responses to the end of the Civil War by describing the
  • policies of the Freedmen’s Bureau
  • restrictions placed on the rights and opportunities of freedmen, including racial segregation and Black Codes.

8 – U5.3.3: Describe the new role of African Americans in local, state, and federal government in the years after the Civil War and the resistance of Southern whites to this change, including the Ku Klux Klan.

8 – U5.3.4: Analyze the intent and the effect of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the Constitution.

8 – U5.3.5: Explain the decision to remove Union troops in 1877 and describe its impact on Americans.

HS - F1.2: Develop an argument/narrative about the changing character of American political society by discussing:
  • the birth of republican government, including the rule of law, inalienable rights, equality, and limited government
  • the development of governmental roles in American life
  • competing views of the responsibilities of governments (federal, state, and local)
  • changes in suffrage qualifications