To navigate this page, any available resources will appear as links below the Content Expectation. Please contact david.johnson@wmisd.org if you have a public domain resource which could be linked to one of these standards.

Vocabulary: The attached vocabulary list came from the Michigan Citizenship Collaborative Curriculum and should be covered throughout the course of the year if you're following the MC3 units.
"I Can" Statements The attached "I Can" statements were developed during the Wexford-Missaukee Intermediate School District curriculum review for Social Studies.

Common Core Writing Examples from Mason Lake Oceana ISD's Social Studies Network.
Common Core (College and Career Readiness Standards) for 11th-12th grade content literacy.
10 Lesson Mock Trial unit developed for WMISD-CTC's Public Safety program. Hits multiple HSCE and Core Standards.

assessment.jpgThere are Northern Michigan Learning Consortium Assessments available for some of these units. Please click here to learn more about how to access them.


folder.jpgMC3 Unit 1 - Foundations of American Government


C.1.1.2: Explain and provide examples of the concepts “power,” “legitimacy,” “authority,” and “sovereignty.”
resource.jpgRESOURCE: A Citizens Vocabulary
pre teaching vocabulary is a relevant strategy, but can also help meet CCRS Reading Standard 4, where students must determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a term over the course of the text. Any document on this page could be used to demonstrate.

C1.1.3:and explain competing arguments about the necessity and purposes of government (such as to protect inalienable rights, promote the general welfare, resolve conflicts, promote equality, and establish justice for all). Also meets C3.4.2.

resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Necessity of Government
Having students read this article and then evaluate the author's premise, claims, and evidence by defending or refuting them with other information hits CCRS Reading Standard 8.

C1.1.4: Explain the purposes of politics, why people engage in the political process, and what the political process can achieve (e.g., promote the greater good, promote self-interest, advance solutions to public issues and problems, achieve a just society).
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Why Youth Should Engage in Policy Making
Having students read this article and then evaluate the author's premise, claims, and evidence by defending or refuting them with other information hits CCRS Reading Standard 8.

C1.2.1: Identify, distinguish among, and provide examples of different forms of governmental structures including anarchy, monarchy, military junta, aristocracy, democracy, authoritarian, constitutional republic, fascist, communist, socialist, and theocratic states.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Different Types of Government
Having students read this article and then evaluate the author's premise, claims, and evidence by defending or refuting them with other information hits CCRS Reading Standard 8. Evaluating various explanations for actions or events and determining which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain hits CCRS Reading 3

C1.2.2: Explain the purposes and uses of constitutions in defining and limiting government, distinguishing between historical and contemporary examples of constitutional governments that failed to limit power (e.g., Nazi Germany and Stalinist Soviet Union) and successful constitutional governments (e.g., contemporary Germany and United Kingdom).


C1.2.3: Compare and contrast parliamentary, federal, con-federal, and unitary systems of government by analyzing similarities and differences in sovereignty, diffusion of power, and institutional structure.

C1.2.4: Compare and contrast direct and representative democracy.

C2.1.1: Explain the historical and philosophical origins of American constitutional government and evaluate the influence of ideas found in the Magna Carta, English Bill of Rights, Mayflower Compact, Iroquois Confederation, Northwest Ordinance, Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom, Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, selected Federalist Papers (such as the 10th, 14th, 51st), John Locke’s Second Treatise, Montesquieu’s Spirit of Laws, and Paine’s Common Sense.

C2.1.2: Explain the significance of the major debates and compromises underlying the formation and ratification of the American constitutional government including the Virginia and New Jersey plans, the Great Compromise, debates between Federalists and Anti-Federalists, debates over slavery, and the promise for a bill of rights after ratification.

C2.1.3: Explain how the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Bill of Rights reflect [fundamental values of America’s constitutional republic (e.g., life, liberty, property, the pursuit of happiness, the common good, justice, equality, diversity, authority, participation, and patriotism) and] political principles of popular sovereignty, rule of law, checks and balances, separation of powers, social compact, natural rights, individual rights, separation of church and state, republicanism, and federalism. Also meets C2.2.1.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Declaration of Independence
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Bill of Rights
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Constitution

Using any of these documents to conduct short research projects to answer a teacher driven question (or student generated question) using both the documents identified above, and student found ones, and having them focus their writing on their overarching question or topic, as well as citing sources properly hits Writing Standard 7.

C2.2.3: Use past and present policies to analyze conflicts that arise in society due to competing constitutional principles or fundamental values (e.g., liberty and authority, justice and equality, individual rights, and the common good).

C2.2.4: Analyze and explain ideas about fundamental values like liberty, justice, and equality found in a range of documents (e.g., Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech and “Letter from Birmingham City Jail,” the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Declaration of Sentiments, the Equal Rights Amendment, and the Patriot Act).
movie.jpgVIDEO: I Have a Dream Speech

resource.jpgRESOURCE: I have a Dream
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Letter from Birmingham City Jail[[@http://www.africa.upenn.edu/Articles_Gen/Letter_Birmingham.html|Add Link]]
resource.jpgRESOURCE: the Universal Declaration of Human rights
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Declaration of Sentiments
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Equal Rights Amendment
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Patriot Act
These are all rich examples of texts which provide many opportunities for both reading and writing to take place. If students are asked to cite specific textual evidence to support their claims regarding them, they will hit CCRS Reading 1. Determining central ideas or information of a primary source providing an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideals hits CCRS Reading 2. Analyzing how the primary sources are structured, including key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text and how they contribute to the whole CCRS Reading 5.

C2.2.5: Use examples to investigate why people may agree on constitutional principles and fundamental values in the abstract, yet disagree over their meaning when they are applied to specific situations.

C3.2.1: Explain how the principles of enumerated powers, federalism, separation of powers, bicameralism, checks and balances, republicanism, rule of law, individual rights [including the Bill of Rights], inalienable rights, separation of church and state, and popular sovereignty serve to limit the power of government. Also meet C3.2.4.

C3.2.3: Identify specific provisions in the Constitution that limit the power of the federal government.

C3.2.4: Explain the role of the Bill of Rights and each of its amendments in restraining the power of government over individuals.
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Bill of Rights
f students are asked to cite specific textual evidence to support their claims regarding them, they will hit CCRS Reading 1. Determining central ideas or information of a primary source providing an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideals hits CCRS Reading 2. Analyzing how the primary sources are structured, including key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text and how they contribute to the whole CCRS Reading 5.

C3.4.1: Explain why the rule of law has a central place in American society (e.g., Supreme Court cases like Marbury v. Madison and U.S. v. Nixon; practices such as submitting bills to legal counsel to ensure congressional compliance with the law).
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Case Brief Summary - Marbury V Madison
resource.jpgRESOURCE: United States v. Nixon
An argumentative piece focused on either of these court cases which introduces knowledgeable claims, develops them fairly and thoroughly supplying the most relevant data and evidence, uses words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the sections of the text and create cohesion, establish a formal style, and provides a concluding statement hits CCRS Writing 1. This would be a longer piece.

C5.1.2: Compare the rights of citizenship an American has as a member of a state and the nation.

C5.2.1: Explain the distinction between citizens by birth, naturalized citizens, and non-citizens.

C5.2.2: Describe the distinction between legal and illegal immigration and the process by which legal immigrants can become citizens.

C5.2.3: Evaluate the criteria used for admission to citizenship in the United States and how Americans expanded citizenship over the centuries (e.g., removing limitations of suffrage).

C5.4.2: [Explain the idea and meaning of citizenship and] describe the importance of citizens’ civic responsibilities including obeying the law, being informed and attentive to public issues, monitoring political leaders and governmental agencies, assuming leadership when appropriate, paying taxes, registering to vote and voting knowledgeably on candidates and issues, serving as a juror, serving in the armed forces, and performing public service [to the preservation of American constitutional democracy]. Also meets C5.1.1; C5.4.1; C5.4.3; C5.5.1; C5.5.2; C5.5.3; C6.2.9.

C6.2.3: Describe how, when, and where individuals can participate in the political process at the local, state, and national levels (including, but not limited to voting, attending political and governmental meetings, contacting public officials, working in campaigns, community organizing, demonstrating or picketing, boycotting, joining interest groups or political action committees); evaluate the effectiveness of these methods.

C6.2.5: Describe how citizen movements seek to realize fundamental values and principles of American constitutional democracy.

C6.2.6: Analyze different ways people have used civil disobedience, the different forms civil disobedience might take (e.g., violent and non-violent) and their impact.

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 2 - Limited Government


C1.1.1: Identify roles citizens play in civic and private life, with emphasis on leadership.

C1.2.4: Compare and contrast direct and representative democracy.

C2.2.5: Use examples to investigate why people may agree on constitutional principles and fundamental values in the abstract, yet disagree over their meaning when they are applied to specific situations.

C3.1.5: Use case studies or examples to examine tensions between the three branches of government (e.g., powers of the purse and impeachment, advise and consent, veto power, and judicial review).

C3.1.6: Evaluate major sources of revenue for the national government, including the constitutional provisions for taxing its citizens.

C3.1.7: Explain why the federal government is one of enumerated powers while state governments are those of reserved powers.

C3.2.1: Explain how the principles of enumerated powers, federalism, separation of powers, bicameralism, checks and balances, republicanism, rule of law, individual rights, inalienable rights, separation of church and state, and popular sovereignty serve to limit the power of the government. Also meets C2.1.3.

C3.2.2: Use court cases to explain how the Constitution is maintained as the supreme law of the land (e.g., Marbury v. Madison, Gibbons v. Ogden, McCulloch v. Maryland).

C3.2.3: Identify specific provisions in the Constitution that limit the power of the federal government.

C3.2.4: Explain the role of the Bill of Rights and each of its amendments in restraining the power of government over individuals.

C3.2.5: Analyze the role of subsequent amendments to the Constitution in extending or limiting the power of government, including the Civil War/Reconstruction Amendments and those expanding suffrage.

C3.3.1: Describe limits the U.S. Constitution places on powers of the states (e.g., prohibitions against coining money, impairing interstate commerce, making treaties with foreign governments) and on the federal government’s power over the states (e.g., federal government cannot abolish a state, Tenth Amendment reserves powers to the states).

C3.3.2: Identify and define states’ reserved and concurrent powers.

C3.3.3: Explain the tension among federal, state, and local governmental power using the necessary and proper clause, the commerce clause, and the Tenth Amendment.

C3.3.4: Describe how state and local governments are organized, their major responsibilities, and how they affect the lives of citizens.

C3.3.5: Describe the mechanisms by which citizens monitor and influence state and local governments (e.g., referendum, initiative, recall).

C3.3.6: Evaluate the major sources of revenue for state and local governments.

C3.3.7: Explain the role of state constitutions in state governments.

C3.5.8: Evaluate, take, and defend positions about the formation and implementation of a current public policy issue, and examine ways to participate in the decision making process about the issue.

C5.1.2: Compare the rights of citizenship Americans have as a member of a state and the nation.

C6.1.1: Identify and research various viewpoints on significant public policy issues.

C6.2.11: Identify typical issues, needs, or concerns of citizens (e.g., seeking variance, zoning changes, information about property taxes), and actively demonstrate ways citizens might use local governments to resolve issues or concerns.

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 3 - The Legislative Branch and Politics


C1.1.4: Explain the purposes of politics, why people engage in the political process, and what the political process can achieve (e.g., promote the greater good, promote self-interest, advance solutions to public issues and problems, achieve a just society).

C2.1.3: Explain how the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Bill of Rights reflected political principles of popular sovereignty, rule of law, checks and balances, separation of powers, social compact, natural rights, individual rights, separation of church and state, republicanism and federalism.

C2.2.3: Use past and present policies to analyze conflicts that arise in society due to competing constitutional principles or fundamental values (e.g., liberty and authority; justice and equality; individual rights and the common good).

C2.2.5: Use examples to investigate why people may agree on constitutional principles and fundamental values in the abstract, yet disagree over their meaning when they are applied to specific situations.

C3.1.1: Analyze the purposes, organization, functions, and processes of the legislative branch as enumerated in Article I of the Constitution.

C3.1.5: Use case studies or examples to examine tensions between the three branches of government (e.g., powers of purse and impeachment, advise and consent, veto power, and judicial review).

C3.2.1: Explain how the principles of enumerated powers, federalism, separation of powers, bicameralism, checks and balances, republicanism, rule of law, individual rights, inalienable rights, separation of church and state, and popular sovereignty serve to limit the power of government.

C3.5.1: Explain how political parties, interest groups, the media, and individuals can influence and determine the public agenda.

C3.5.2: Describe the origin and the evolution of political parties and their influence.

C3.5.3: Identify and explain the roles of various associations and groups in American politics (e.g., political organizations, political action committees, interest groups, voluntary and civic associations, professional organizations, unions, and religious groups).

C3.5.4: Explain the concept of public opinion, factors that shape it, and contrasting views on the role it should play in public policy.

C3.5.5: Evaluate the actual influence of public opinion on public policy.

C3.5.7: Explain the role of television, radio, the press, and the internet in political communication.

C3.5.8: Evaluate, take, and defend positions about the formation and implementation of a current public policy issue, and examine ways to participate in the decision making process about the issue.

C3.5.9: In making a decision on a public issue, analyze various forms of political communication (e.g., political cartoons, campaign advertisements, political speeches, and blogs) using criteria like logical validity, factual accuracy and/or omission, emotional appeal, distorted evidence, and appeals to bias or prejudice.

C6.1.1: Identify and research various viewpoints on significant public policy issues.

C6.1.2: Locate, analyze, and use various forms of evidence, information, and sources about a significant public policy issue, including primary and secondary sources, legal documents (e.g., constitutions, court decisions, state law), non-text based information (e.g., maps, charts, tables, graphs, and cartoons), and other forms of political communication (e.g., political cartoons, campaign advertisements, political speeches, and blogs).

C6.1.4: Address a public issue by suggesting alternative solutions or courses of action, evaluating the consequences of each, and proposing an action to address the issue or resolve the problem.

C6.1.5: Make a persuasive, reasoned argument on a public issue and support [it] using evidence (e.g., historical and contemporary examples), constitutional principles, and fundamental values of American constitutional democracy; explain the stance or position.

C6.2.1: Describe the relationship between politics and the attainment of individual and public goals (e.g., how individual interests are fulfilled by working to achieve collective goals).

C6.2.2: Distinguish between and evaluate the importance of political participation and social participation.

C6.2.8: Describe various forms and functions of political leadership and evaluate the characteristics of an effective leader.

C6.2.10: Participate in a real or simulated public hearing or debate and evaluate the role of deliberative public discussions in civic life.

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 4 - The Executive Branch and World Affairs


C2.2.5: Use examples to investigate why people may agree on constitutional principles and fundamental values in the abstract, yet disagree over their meaning when they are applied to specific situations.

C3.1.2: Analyze the purposes, organization, functions, and processes of the executive branch as enumerated in Article II of the Constitution.

C3.1.4: Identify the role of independent regulatory agencies in the federal bureaucracy (e.g., Federal Reserve Board, Food and Drug Administration, Federal Communications Commission).

C3.1.5: Use case studies or examples to examine tensions between the three branches of government (e.g., powers of purse and impeachment, advise and consent, veto power, and judicial review).

C3.2.1: Explain how the principles of enumerated powers, federalism, separation of powers, bicameralism, checks and balances, republicanism, rule of law, individual rights, inalienable rights, separation of church and state, and popular sovereignty serve to limit the power of government.
C3.5.6: Explain the significance of campaigns and elections in American politics, current criticisms of campaigns, and proposals for their reform.

C3.5.7: Explain the role of television, radio, the press, and the internet in political communication.

C4.1.1: Identify and evaluate major foreign policy positions that have characterized the United States’ relations with the world (e.g., isolated nation, imperial power, world leader) in light of foundational values and principles, provide examples of how they were implemented and their consequences (e.g., Spanish-American War, Cold War containment).

C4.1.2: Describe the process by which United States foreign policy is made, including the powers the Constitution gives to the president; Congress and the judiciary; and the roles federal agencies, domestic interest groups, the public, and the media play in foreign policy.

C4.1.3: Evaluate the means used to implement U.S. foreign policy with respect to current or past international issues (e.g., diplomacy, economic, military and humanitarian aid, treaties, sanctions, military intervention, and covert action).

C4.1.4: Using at least two historical examples, explain the reasons for, and consequences of, conflicts that arise when international disputes cannot be resolved peacefully.

C4.2.4: Identify the purposes and functions of governmental and non-governmental international organizations, and the role of the United States in each (e.g., the United Nations, NATO World Court, Organization of American States, International Red Cross, Amnesty International).

C4.2.5: Evaluate the role of the United States in important bilateral and multilateral agreements (e.g., NAFTA, Helsinki Accords, Antarctic Treaty, Most Favored Nation Agreements, and Kyoto Protocol).

C6.1.1: Identify and research various viewpoints on significant public policy issues.

C6.1.2: Locate, analyze, and use various forms of evidence, information, and sources about a significant public policy issue, including primary and secondary sources, legal documents (e.g., constitutions, court decisions, state law), non-text based information (e.g., maps, charts, tables, graphs, and cartoons), and other forms of political communication (e.g., political cartoons, campaign advertisements, political speeches, and blogs).

C6.1.3: Develop and use criteria (logical validity, factual accuracy and/or omission, emotional appeals to bias or prejudice, overall strength of argument) in analyzing evidence and position statements.

C6.2.4: Participate in a real or simulated election, and evaluate the results, including the impact of voter turnout and demographics.