To navigate this page, any available resources will appear as links below the Content Expectation. Please contact david.johnson@wmisd.org
if you have a public domain resource which could be linked to one of these standards.
Vocabulary: The attached vocabulary list came from the Michigan Citizenship Collaborative Curriculum and should be covered throughout the course of the year if you're following the MC3 units.

"I Can" Statements The attached "I Can" statements were developed during the Wexford-Missaukee Intermediate School District curriculum review for Social Studies.

Common Core Writing Examples from Mason Lake Oceana ISD's Social Studies Network.
Common Core (College and Career Readiness Standards) for content literacy in 9th and 10th grade Social Studies.
assessment.jpgThere are Northern Michigan Learning Consortium Assessments available for some of these units. Please click here to learn more about how to access them.

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 1 - Foundations - Beginnings through Reconstruction

USHG F1.1: Identify the core ideals of American society as reflected in the documents below and analyze the ways that American society moved toward and/or away from its core ideals
  • Declaration of Independence
  • the U.S. Constitution (including the Preamble)
  • Bill of Rights
  • the Gettysburg Address
  • 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Declaration of Independence
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The US Constitution
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Bill of Rights
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Gettysburg Address
resource.jpgRESOURCE: the 13th Amendment
resource.jpgRESOURCE: the 14th Amendment
resource.jpgRESOURCE: the 15th Amendment
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Helping to Move On - An Analysis of the Reconstruction Amendments

The 13th, 14th, and 15th amendment sites have not only the full text of the amendments, but a lot of linking and background information on their passage. Invite students to explore these sites in a computer lab, or look at certain portions of the website together as a whole class. For any of these resources, analyze either as a class or individually the selected documents and lead a discussion on how they fit into the social scheme of things in their respective times. (CCRS Reading in Social Studies Standard 1 for 9th-10th grade) These also include primary sources from the day. The Helping to Move on site can be used in a similar fashion.

resource.jpgRESOURCE: Engage NY Gettysburg Address Close and Critical Reading Exemplar
This exemplar is already CCRS ready!

A ready to go lesson plan that hits multiple CCRS!

USHG F1.2: Using the American Revolution, the creation and adoption of the Constitution, and the Civil War as touchstones, develop an argument /narrative about the changing character of American political society and the roles of key individuals across cultures in prompting/ supporting the change by discussing
  • the birth of republican government, including the rule of law, inalienable rights, equality, and limited government
  • the development of governmental roles in American life
  • competing views of the responsibilities of governments (federal, state, and local)
  • changes in suffrage qualifications
  • the development of political parties
  • America’s political and economic role in the world
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The American Revolution
resource.jpgRESOURCE: The Civil War
Both of these websites offer a great interactive map and lesson which can help remind students of the basics. Do together as a whole class, OR have students review these individually in a computer lab setting. From there, this HSCE is almost a performance task. If you have students write a paper on this topic, it would hit CCRS Writing Standard for history 2.

USHG F2.1: Describe the major trends and transformations in American life prior to 1877 including
  • changing political boundaries of the United States
  • regional economic differences and similarities, including goods produced and the nature of the labor force
  • changes in the size, location, and composition of the population
  • patterns of immigration and migration
  • development of cities
  • changes in commerce, transportation, and communication
  • major changes in Foreign Affairs marked by such events as the War of 1812, the Mexican-American War, and foreign relations during the Civil War.

C2.1.1: Explain the historical and philosophical origins of American constitutional government and evaluate the influence of ideas found in the Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, selected Federalist Papers (such as the 10th, 14th, and 51st), John Locke’s Second Treatise, and Montesquieu’s Spirit of Laws (portions omitted).

C2.1.2: Explain the significance of the major debates and compromises underlying the formation and ratification of American constitutional government including the Virginia and New Jersey plans, the Great Compromise, debates between Federalists and Anti-Federalists, debates over slavery, and the promise for a bill of rights after ratification.

C2.1.3: Explain how the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights reflected political principles of popular sovereignty, rule of law, checks and balances, separation of powers, social compact, natural rights, individual rights, separation of church and state, republicanism, and federalism. See also C3.2.4 and C2.2.1

C2.1.4: Explain challenges and modifications to American constitutional government as a result of significant historical events such as the American Revolution, Civil War, expansion of suffrage, the Great Depression, and the civil rights movement.

C2.2.1: Identify and explain the fundamental values of America’s constitutional republic (e.g., life, liberty, property, the pursuit of happiness, the common good, justice, equality, diversity, authority, participation, and patriotism) and their reflection in the principles of the United States Constitution (e.g., popular sovereignty, republicanism, rule of law, checks and balances, separation of powers, and federalism).

C2.2.4: Analyze and explain ideas about fundamental values like liberty, justice, and equality found in a range of documents (e.g., Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech and “Letter from Birmingham City Jail,” the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Declaration of Sentiments, the Equal Rights Amendment, and the Patriot Act).

C3.1.1: Analyze the purpose, organization, and powers of the legislative branch as enumerated in Article I of the Constitution.

C3.1.2: Analyze the purpose, organization, and powers of the executive branch as enumerated in Article II of the Constitution.

C3.1.3: Analyze the purpose, organization, and powers of the judicial branch as enumerated in Article III of the Constitution.

C3.2.4: Explain the role of the Bill of Rights and each of its amendments in restraining the power of government over individuals.

C3.2.5: Analyze the role of subsequent amendments to the Constitution in extending or limiting the power of government, including the Civil War/Reconstruction Amendments and those expanding suffrage.

C6.1.2: Analyze and use various forms of evidence, information, and sources, including primary and secondary sources, legal documents (e.g., Constitutions, court decisions, state law), non-text based information (e.g., maps, charts, tables, graphs, and cartoons), and other forms of communication.

C6.1.3: Develop and use criteria in analyzing evidence and position statements.

C6.1.5: Make a persuasive and reasoned argument on a public issue and support using evidence (e.g., historical and contemporary examples), constitutional principles, and fundamental values of American constitutional democracy; explain the stance or position.

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 2 - Growth of Industrial and Urban America

USHG F1.1: Identify the core ideals of American society as reflected in the documents below and analyze the ways that American society moved toward and/or away from its core ideals
  • Declaration of Independence
  • the U.S. Constitution (including the Preamble)
  • Bill of Rights
  • the Gettysburg Address
  • 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments.

USHG 6.1.1: Factors in the American Industrial Revolution - Analyze the factors that enabled the United States to become a major industrial power, including
  • gains from trade
  • organizational “revolution” (e.g., development of corporations and labor organizations)
  • advantages of physical geography
  • increase in labor through immigration and migration
  • economic policies of government and industrial leaders (including Andrew Carnegie and John D. Rockefeller)
  • technological advances.

USHG 6.1.2: Labor’s Response to Industrial Growth - Evaluate the different responses of labor to industrial change including
  • development of organized labor, including the Knights of Labor, American Federation of Labor, and the United Mine Workers
  • southern and western farmers’ reactions, including the growth of populism and the populist movement (e.g., Farmers Alliance, Grange, Platform of the Populist Party, William Jennings Bryan’s “Cross of Gold” speech).
resource.jpgRESOURCE: Populist Party Platform
resource.jpgRESOURCE: William Jennings Bryan's Cross of Gold Speech

USHG 6.1.3: Urbanization - Analyze the changing urban and rural landscape by examining:
  • the location and expansion of major urban centers
  • the growth of cities linked by industry and trade
  • the development of cities divided by race, ethnicity, and class
  • resulting tensions among and within groups
  • different perspectives about immigrant experiences in the urban setting

USGH 6.1.4: Population Changes - Use census data from 1790 -1940 to describe changes in the composition, distribution, and density of the American population and analyze their causes, including immigration, the Great Migration, and urbanization.

C6.1.2: Analyze and use various forms of evidence, information, and sources, including primary and secondary sources, legal documents (e.g., Constitutions, court decisions, state law), non-text based information (e.g., maps, charts, tables, graphs, and cartoons), and other forms of communication (e.g., political cartoons, campaign advertisements, political speeches, blogs).

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 3 - Progressivism and Reform

USHG F1.1: Identify the core ideals of American society as reflected in the documents below and analyze the ways that American society moved toward and/or away from its core ideals
  • Declaration of Independence
  • the U.S. Constitution (including the Preamble)
  • Bill of Rights
  • the Gettysburg Address
  • 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments

USHG 6.1.5: A Case Study of American Industrialism - Using the automobile industry as a case study, analyze the causes and consequences of this major industrial transformation by explaining
  • the impact of resource availability
  • entrepreneurial decision making by Henry Ford and others
  • domestic and international migrations
  • the development of an industrial work force
  • the impact on Michigan
  • the impact on American society.

USHG 6.3.1: Social Issues - Describe at least three significant problems or issues created by America’s industrial and urban transformation between 1895 and 1930 (e.g., urban and rural poverty and blight, child labor, immigration, political corruption, public health, poor working conditions, and monopolies).


USHG 6.3.2: Causes and Consequences of Progressive Reform - Analyze the causes, consequences, and limitations of Progressive reform in the following areas
  • major changes in the Constitution, including 16th, 17th, 18th, and 19th Amendments
  • new regulatory legislation (e.g., Pure Food and Drug Act, Sherman and Clayton Anti-Trust Acts)
  • the Supreme Court’s role in supporting or slowing reform
  • role of reform organizations, movements and individuals in promoting change (e.g., Woman’s Christian Temperance Union, settlement house movement, conservation movement, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Jane Addams, Carrie Chapman Catt, Eugene Debs, W.E.B. DuBois, Upton Sinclair, Ida Tarbell)
  • efforts to expand and restrict the practices of democracy as reflected in post-Civil War struggles of African-Americans and immigrants.

resource.jpgRESOURCE: Upton Sinclair "The Jungle"

USHG 6.3.3: Women’s Suffrage - Analyze the successes and failures of efforts to expand women’s rights, including the work of important leaders (e.g., Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton) and the eventual ratification of the 19th Amendment.

C1.2.4: Compare and contrast direct and representative democracy.

C2.1.4: Explain challenges and modifications to American constitutional government as a result of significant historical events such as the American Revolution, Civil War, expansion of suffrage, the Great Depression, and the civil rights movement.

C3.2.5: Analyze the role of subsequent amendments to the Constitution in extending or limiting the power of government, including the Civil War/Reconstruction Amendments and those expanding suffrage.

C3.5.1: Explain how political parties, interest groups, the media, and individuals influence public opinion and the public agenda, and ultimately public policy. (See also C3.5.3, C3.5.4, C3.5.5, C3.5.7, and C3.3.5).

C6.1.1: Identify and research various viewpoints on significant public policy issues.

C.6.1.4: Address a public issue by suggesting alternative solutions or courses, evaluating the consequences of each, and proposing an action to address the issue or resolve the problem.

C6.1.5: Make a persuasive, reasoned argument on a public issue and support using evidence (e.g., historical and contemporary examples), constitutional principles, and fundamental values of American constitutional democracy; explain the stance or position.

E1.4.4: Functions of Government – Explain the various functions of government in a market economy including the provision of public goods and services, the creation of currency, the establishment of property rights, the enforcement of contracts, correcting for externalities and market failures, the redistribution of income and wealth, regulation of labor (e.g., minimum wage, child labor, working conditions), and the promotion of economic growth and security

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 4 - Becoming a World Power

USHG 6.2.1: Growth of US Global Power - Locate on a map the territories (Cuba, Puerto Rico, Philippines, Hawaii, Panama Canal Zone) acquired by the United States during its emergence as an imperial power between 1890 and 1914, and analyze the role the Spanish American War, the Philippine Revolution, the Panama Canal, the Open Door Policy, and the Roosevelt Corollary played in expanding America’s global influence and redefining its foreign policy.

USHG 6.2.2: World War I - Explain the causes of World War I, the reasons for American neutrality and eventual entry into the war, and America’s role in shaping the course of the war.

USHG 6.2.3: Domestic Impact of WWI - Analyze the domestic impact of World War I on the growth of the government (e.g., War Industries Board), the expansion of the economy, the restrictions on civil liberties (e.g., Sedition Act, Red Scare, Palmer Raids), and the expansion of women’s suffrage.

USHG 6.2.4: Wilson and His Opponents - Explain how Wilson’s “Fourteen Points” differed from proposals by others, including French and British leaders and domestic opponents, in the debate over the Versailles Treaty, United States participation in the League of Nations, the redrawing of European political boundaries, and the resulting geopolitical tensions that continued to affect Europe.

C3.4.4: Describe considerations and criteria that have been used to deny, limit, or extend protection of individual rights (e.g., clear and present danger, time, place and manner restrictions on speech, compelling government interest, security, libel or slander, public safety, and equal opportunity).

C3.5.1: Explain how political parties, interest groups, the media, and individuals can influence and determine the public agenda.

C3.5.5: Evaluate the actual influence of public opinion on public policy.

C3.5.7: Explain the role of television, radio, the press, and the internet in political communication.

C3.5.9: In making a decision on a public issue, analyze various forms of political communication (e.g., political cartoons, campaign advertisements, political speeches, and blogs) using criteria like logical validity, factual accuracy and/or omission, emotional appeal, distorted evidence, and appeals to bias or prejudice.

C4.1.1: Identify and evaluate major foreign policy positions that have characterized the United States’ relations with the world (e.g., isolated nation, imperial power, world leader) in light of foundational values and principles, provide examples of how they were implemented and their consequences (e.g., Spanish-American War, Cold War containment).

C4.1.2: Describe the process by which United States foreign policy is made, including the powers the Constitution gives to the president, Congress and the judiciary; and the roles federal agencies, domestic interest groups, the public, and the media play in foreign policy.

C4.1.3: Evaluate the means used to implement U.S. foreign policy with respect to current or past international issues (e.g., diplomacy, economic, military and humanitarian aid, treaties, sanctions, military intervention, and covert action).

C4.1.4: Using at least two historical examples, explain reasons for, and consequences of, conflicts that arise when international disputes cannot be resolved peacefully.

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 5 - The Crisis of Capitalism and Responses

USHG 7.1.1: The Twenties – Identify and explain the significance of the cultural changes and tensions in the “Roaring Twenties” including
  • cultural movements, such as the Harlem Renaissance and the “lost generation”
  • the struggle between “traditional” and “modern” America (e.g., Scopes Trial, immigration restrictions, Prohibition, role of women, mass consumption).

USHG 7.1.2: Causes and Consequences of the Great Depression – Explain and evaluate the multiple causes and consequences of the Great Depression by analyzing
  • the political, economic, environmental, and social causes of the Great Depression including fiscal policy, overproduction, under consumption, speculation, the 1929 crash, and the Dust Bowl.
  • the economic and social toll of the Great Depression, including unemployment and environmental conditions that affected farmers, industrial workers, and families
  • Hoover’s policies and their impact (e.g., Reconstruction Finance Corporation).

USHG 7.1.3: The New Deal – Explain and evaluate Roosevelt’s New Deal Policies including
  • expanding federal government’s responsibilities to protect the environment (e.g., Dust Bowl and the Tennessee Valley), meet challenges of unemployment, address the needs of the workers, farmers, poor, and elderly
  • opposition to the New Deal and the impact of the Supreme Court in striking down and then accepting New Deal laws
  • consequences of New Deal policies (e.g., promoting workers’ rights, development of Social Security program, banking and financial regulation, conservation practices, crop subsidies).

C1.1.3: Identify and explain competing arguments about the necessity and purposes of government (such as to protect inalienable rights, promote the general welfare, resolve conflicts, promote equality, and establish justice for all).
C2.1.4: Explain challenges and modifications to American constitutional government as a result of significant historical events such as the American Revolution, the Civil War, expansion of suffrage, the Great Depression, and the civil rights movement.

C3.1.5: Use case studies or examples to examine tensions between the three branches of government (e.g., powers of the purse and impeachment, advise and consent, veto power, and judicial review).

E2.1.2: Circular Flow and the National Economy – Using the concept of circular flow, analyze the roles of and the relationships between households, business firms, financial institutions, and government and non-government agencies in the economy of the United States.

E2.1.7: Economic Indicators – Using a number of indicators, such as GDP, per capita GDP, unemployment rates, and Consumer Price Index, analyze the characteristics of business cycles, including the characteristics of peaks, recessions, and expansions.

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 6 - World War II

USHG F1.1: Identify the core ideals of American society as reflected in the documents below and analyze the ways that American society moved toward and/or away from its core ideals:
  • Declaration of Independence
  • the U.S. Constitution (including the Preamble)
  • Bill of Rights
  • the Gettysburg Address
  • 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments.

USHG 7.2.1: Causes of WWII – Analyze the factors contributing to World War II in Europe and in the Pacific region, and America’s entry into war including:
  • the political and economic disputes over territory (e.g., failure of Versailles Treaty, League of Nations, Munich Agreement)
  • the differences in the civic and political values of the United States and those of Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan
  • United States neutrality
  • the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

USHG 7.2.2: U.S. and the Course of WWII– Evaluate the role of the U.S. in fighting the war militarily, diplomatically, and technologically across the world (e.g., Germany First strategy, Big Three Alliance, and the development of atomic weapons).

USHG 7.2.3: Impact of WWII on American Life– Analyze the changes in American life brought about by U.S. participation in World War II including:
  • mobilization of economic, military, and social resources
  • role of women and minorities in the war effort
  • role of the home front in supporting the war effort (e.g., rationing, work hours, taxes)
  • internment of Japanese-Americans.

USHG 7.2.4: Responses to Genocide– Investigate development and enactment of Hitler’s “final solution” policy, and the responses to genocide by the Allies, the U.S. government, international organizations, and individuals (e.g., liberation of concentration camps, Nuremberg war crimes tribunals, establishment of state of Israel).

USHG 8.1.1: Origins and Beginnings of Cold War – Analyze the factors that contributed to the Cold War including:
  • differences in the civic, ideological and political values, and the economic and governmental institutions of the U.S. and U.S.S.R.
  • diplomatic decisions made at the Yalta and Potsdam Conferences (1945)
  • actions by both countries in the last years of and years following World War II (e.g., the use of the atomic bomb, the Marshall Plan, the Truman Doctrine, North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and Warsaw Pact).

C1.2.1: Identify, distinguish among, and provide examples of different forms of governmental structures including anarchy, monarchy, military junta, aristocracy, democracy, authoritarian, constitutional republic, fascist, communist, socialist, and theocratic states.

C2.2.3: Use past and present policies to analyze conflicts that arise in society due to competing constitutional principles or fundamental values (e.g., liberty and authority, justice and equality, individual rights, and the common good).

C3.4.4: Describe considerations and criteria that have been used to deny, limit, or extend protection of individual rights (e.g., clear and present danger, time, place and manner restrictions on speech, compelling government interest, security, libel or slander, public safety, and equal opportunity).

C3.5.9: In making a decision on a public issue, analyze various forms of political communication (e.g., political cartoons, campaign advertisements, political speeches, and blogs) using criteria like logical validity, factual accuracy and/or omission, emotional appeal, distorted evidence, and appeals to bias or prejudice.

C4.1.3: Evaluate the means used to implement U.S. foreign policy with respect to current or past international issues (e.g., diplomacy, economic, military and humanitarian aid, treaties, sanctions, military intervention, and covert action).

C4.1.4: Using at least two historical examples, explain reasons for, and consequences of, conflicts that arise when international disputes cannot be resolved peacefully.

C4.2.1: Describe how different political systems interact in world affairs with respect to international issues.

C4.2.4: Identify the purposes and functions of governmental and non-governmental international organizations, and the role of the United States in each (e.g., the United Nations, NATO, World Court, Organization of American States, International Red Cross, Amnesty International).

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 7 - The Cold War

USHG F1.1: Identify the core ideals of American society as reflected in the documents below and analyze the ways that American society moved toward and/or away from its core ideals
  • Declaration of Independence
  • the U.S. Constitution (including the Preamble)
  • Bill of Rights
  • the Gettysburg Address
    • 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments
USHG 8.1.1: Origins and Beginnings of Cold War – Analyze the factors that contributed to the Cold War including
  • differences in civic, ideological and political values, and the economic and governmental institutions of the U.S. and U.S.S.R.
  • diplomatic decisions made at the Yalta and Potsdam Conferences (1945)
  • actions by both countries in the last years of and years following World War II (e.g., the use of the atomic bomb, the Marshall Plan, the Truman Doctrine, North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), and Warsaw Pact).
USHG 8.1.2: Foreign Policy during the Cold War – Evaluate the origins, setbacks, and successes of the American policy of “containing” the Soviet Union, including
  • the development of a U.S. national security establishment, composed of the Department of Defense and Department of State, and the intelligence community
  • the armed struggle with Communism, including the Korean conflict
  • direct conflicts within specific world regions including Germany and Cuba
  • U.S. involvement in Vietnam, and the foreign and domestic consequences of the war (e.g., relationship/conflicts with U.S.S.R. and China, U.S. military policy and practices, responses to citizens and mass media)
  • indirect (or proxy) confrontations within specific world regions (e.g., Chile, Angola, Iran, and Guatemala)
  • the arms race.
USHG 8.2.1: Demographic Changes – Use population data to produce and analyze maps that show the major changes in population distribution, spatial patterns and density, including the Baby Boom, new immigration, suburbanization, reverse migration of African Americans to the South, and the flow of population to the “Sunbelt.”
USHG 8.2.2: Policy Concerning Domestic Issues – Analyze major domestic issues in the Post-World War II era and the policies designed to meet the challenges by
  • describing issues challenging Americans such as domestic anticommunism (McCarthyism), labor, poverty, health care, infrastructure, immigration, and the environment
  • evaluating policy decisions and legislative actions to meet these challenges (e.g., G.I. Bill of Rights (1944), Taft-Hartley Act (1947), Twenty-Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution (1951), Federal Highways Act (1956), National Defense Act (1957), E.P.A (1970)).
C1.2.1: Identify, distinguish among, and provide examples of different forms of governmental structures including anarchy, monarchy, military junta, aristocracy, democracy, authoritarian, constitutional republic, fascist, communist, socialist, and theocratic states.
C2.2.3: Use past and present policies to analyze conflicts that arise in society due to competing constitutional principles or fundamental values (e.g., liberty and authority, justice and equality, individual rights, and the common good).
C3.5.9: In making a decision on a public issue, analyze various forms of political communication (e.g., political cartoons, campaign advertisements, political speeches, and blogs) using criteria like logical validity, factual accuracy and/or omission, emotional appeal, distorted evidence, and appeals to bias or prejudice.
C4.1.1: Identify and evaluate major foreign policy positions that have characterized the United States’ relations with the world (e.g., isolated nation, imperial power, world leader), in light of foundational values and principles, provide examples of how they were implemented and their consequences (e.g., Spanish-American War, Cold War containment).
C4.1.3: Evaluate the means used to implement U.S. foreign policy with respect to current or past international issues (e.g., diplomacy, economic, military and humanitarian aid, treaties, sanctions, military intervention, and covert action).
C4.1.4: Using at least two historical examples, explain reasons for, and consequences of, conflicts that arise when international disputes cannot be resolved peacefully.
C4.2.2: Analyze the impact of American political, economic, technological, and cultural developments around the world on other parts of the world (e.g., immigration policies, economic, military and humanitarian aid, computer technology research, popular fashion, and film).
E3.1.5: Comparing Economic Systems – Using the three basic economic questions (what to produce, how to produce, and for whom to produce), compare and contrast a socialist (command) economy (such as North Korea or Cuba) with the capitalist or mixed economy of the United States.

folder.jpgMC3 Unit 8 - In the Midst of the Cold War: Civil Rights and Other Domestic Policies

USHG F1.1: Identify the core ideals of American society as reflected in the documents below and analyze the ways that American society moved toward and/or away from its core ideals
  • Declaration of Independence
  • the U.S. Constitution (including the Preamble)
  • Bill of Rights
  • the Gettysburg Address
  • 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments

USHG 8.3.1: Civil Rights Movement - Analyze the key events, ideals, documents, and organizations in the struggle for civil rights by African Americans including
  • the impact of WWII and the Cold War (e.g., racial and gender integration of the military)
  • Supreme Court decisions and governmental actions (e.g., Brown v. Board (1954), Civil Rights Act (1957), Little Rock schools desegregation, Civil Rights Act (1964), Voting Rights Act (1965))
  • protest movements, organizations, and civil actions (e.g., integration of baseball, Montgomery Bus Boycott (1955-1956), March on Washington (1963), freedom rides, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), Nation of Islam, Black Panthers)
  • resistance to Civil Rights.

USHG 8.3.2: Ideals of the Civil Rights Movement - Compare and contrast the ideas in Martin Luther King’s March on Washington speech to the ideas expressed in the Declaration of Independence, the Seneca Falls Resolution, and the Gettysburg Address.

C1.1.3: Identify and explain competing arguments about the necessity and purposes of government (such as to protect inalienable rights, promote the general welfare, resolve conflicts, promote equality, and establish justice for all). (See also C3.4.2)

C2.1.4: Explain challenges and modifications to American constitutional government as a result of significant historical events such as the Civil War, expansion of suffrage, the Great Depression, and the civil rights movement.

C2.2.2: Explain and evaluate how Americans, either through individual or collective actions, use constitutional principles and fundamental values to narrow gaps between American ideals and reality with respect to minorities, women, and the disadvantaged.

C2.2.4: Analyze and explain ideas about fundamental values like liberty, justice, and equality found in a range of documents (e.g., Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech and “Letter from Birmingham City Jail,” the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Declaration of Sentiments, the Equal Rights Amendment, and the Patriot Act).

C3.4.3: Explain the meaning and importance of equal protection of the law (e.g., the 14th amendment, Americans with Disabilities act, equal opportunity legislation).

C6.2.5: Describe how citizen movements seek to realize fundamental values and principles of American constitutional democracy.

C6.2.6: Analyze different ways people have used civil disobedience, the different forms civil disobedience might take (e.g., violent and non-violent) and their impact.